The Red Sox’ use of Toradol was contrary to state law

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Jeff Passan of Yahoo! reports that the Red Sox’ use of Toradol was contrary to state law and industry guidelines. Specifically: Passan quotes Curt Schilling — and, importantly, two other sources who are not Curt Schilling — who say that the Red Sox’ trainer routinely injected it into players despite state laws which prohibit sports trainers from doing do.

Toradol, in the news recently because of Jonathan Papelbon saying that the Phillies would not let him use it, is a legal anti-inflammatory. It’s more powerful, however, and has been linked to serious side effects. Many teams use it — many also via injections from athletic trainers — but it remains controversial.

Passan reports that the methods of Toradol injection on the Red Sox weren’t, if his sources are correct, in compliance with the law. Indeed, they sounded downright furtive:

Two other sources described the same scene as Schilling: Reinold and a player stashed away in a secluded area, away from the trainers’ room, with [Red Sox trainer Mike] Reinold jabbing a needle into a player’s buttocks before a game.

Major League Baseball investigated Reinold and the Red Sox and last year issued an edict forbidding trainers from injecting players with Toradol. Whether the state gets involved and investigates depends on whether someone files a complaint. Which seems unlikely, but who knows?

Interesting stuff.

Marlins intend to keep Christian Yelich

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With Giancarlo Stanton and Marcell Ozuna gone, the next logical step for the Marlins would be to trade away Christian Yelich. He’s be an amazingly attractive trade candidate given that he is under team control through 2022, and is owed a very reasonable $58 million or so. He just turned 26 last week and has hit .290/.369/.432 in his five year career. That’s the kind of player and contract that could bring back a mess of prospects.

Except the Marlins, it seems, don’t want to do that. Multiple reports have come out in the last hour saying that the Marlins intend to hold on to Yelich and to build around him.

That could be a negotiating ploy, of course. They’ll no doubt listen to offers and, if the right one comes along, they’d certainly give strong consideration to trading him. A good deal is a good deal.

The only question, in light of the events of the last week, is whether the Marlins would know a good deal if they saw one.