Ryan Braun listed in more Biogenesis docs … and it makes Braun look BAD

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Ryan Braun? What was that you were saying about it only being your lawyers consulting with Biogenesis for purposes of your PED appeal? If that’s the case, then what’s this about your name showing up on another document in the Biogenesis records? One that is more closely associated with PED customers.  T.J. Quinn and Mike Finn of ESPN report:

The list was written in April, in the hand of Biogenesis of America clinic founder Anthony Bosch. Among the names is the Milwaukee Brewers’ Ryan Braun, and to the right of that name is a figure: $1,500.

That list, a source familiar with Bosch’s operation told “Outside the Lines,” indicates that those players received performance-enhancing drugs from Bosch, and owed him money. The document, one of dozens obtained by “Outside the Lines,” suggests a closer link to Bosch and the now-shuttered clinic he ran in Coral Gables, Fla., than Braun has acknowledged.

As before, this is not definitive proof of anything and, in and of itself, does not establish that Braun did anything wrong or give Major League Baseball grounds for action. We simply don’t know whether the Biogenesis records accurately reflect what occurred (they are the very definition of hearsay).

But: Braun gave a pretty specific explanation for his name appearing in those records in the first place. And it’s inconsistent with what Quinn and Fish are reporting here.

I believe you have to give guys the benefit of the doubt when the evidence does not give you anything more to go on than supposition and conjecture. But there’s no escaping that this, at least on the surface, contradicts Braun’s previous explanation and that’s not a good thing for Ryan Braun.

UPDATE: This may all be sexy, but it may not matter.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.