Report: Curt Schilling’s claim that someone suggested he use PEDs was “completely baseless”


More fallout from the Curt Schilling controversy from last week.  Gordon Edes of ESPN Boston has two sources with direct knowledge of the 2008 investigation into Schilling’s claims that a Red Sox employee suggested he take PEDs telling him that the claim by Schilling was “completely baseless.”

Theo Epstein and a spokesman for Major League Baseball said last week there was an investigation and that it did not result in discipline (more comment from Theo here).  This report, however, seems to take it a bit further, suggesting not only was no wrongdoing found but suggesting that Schilling made it all up.  For his part, Schilling stands by the story.

This has become such a weird story. I still wonder why initial responses from MLB and from Jed Hoyer suggested no knowledge of the incident. But that could be just a quirk of memory or a matter of people not fully authorized to say things vamping for time until official statements could be made.  This stuff — the suggestion that Schilling was crying wolf — was even weirder.

Maybe a function of Schilling’s then well known dispute with the Red Sox about how to treat his injured shoulder? He wants surgery, they suggest treatment and medication and he, being the dramatic sort, takes that to be a suggestion to take PEDs?

No idea, but with Schilling I suppose anything is possible.

Dexter Fowler becomes first black player to play for the Cubs in the World Series

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Dexter Fowler #24 of the Chicago Cubs reacts after striking out in the first inning against the Cleveland Indians in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Tim Bradbury/Getty Images)
Tim Bradbury/Getty Images

The last time the Cubs were in the World Series was 1945, two years before Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in baseball. As such, until Tuesday night, the Cubs never had a black player play for them in the World Series.

Dexter Fowler changed that, leading off the ballgame at Progressive Field against the Indians. Fowler was made aware of this fact three days ago by Rany Jazayerli of The Ringer:

Fowler, in that at-bat, went ahead in the count 2-1 but ended up striking out looking on a Corey Kluber sinker.

Drew Pomeranz does not need arm surgery

BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 10:  Drew Pomeranz #31 of the Boston Red Sox throws a pitch in the fifth inning against the Cleveland Indians during game three of the American League Divison Series at Fenway Park on October 10, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Red Sox lefty Drew Pomeranz was of limited utility during the postseason as he began experiencing soreness in his left forearm near the end of the 2016 season. There was some thought that he might need offseason surgery but Pomeranz was examined by doctors who determined that he does not need any surgery, Evan Drellich of the Boston Herald reports. President of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said:

He has seen the doctor, the doctor looked at him. I can’t really disclose totally everything that was done, but the doctor said no surgical procedure and the doctor feels he will be ready for next spring training for us.

Pomeranz, 27, finished the 2016 regular season with an aggregate 3.32 ERA and a 186/65 K/BB ratio in 170 2/3 innings between the Padres and Red Sox. He operated out of the bullpen during the playoffs, allowing two runs on four hits and two walks with seven strikeouts over 3 2/3 innings.

The Red Sox acquired Pomeranz in a trade with the Padres in July. It was a trade that earned Padres GM A.J. Preller a 30-day suspension from Major League Baseball, as he reportedly kept two sets of medical records in order to deceive trade partners.