Not all of the dangerous, controversial drugs are banned in baseball

64 Comments

We get up in arms about testosterone and HGH — substances our bodies naturally produce and which have few serious side effects or long-lasting consequences — because they’re on a banned list. Meanwhile there’s a drug that a lot of athletes take under the direction and supervision of their teams which can kill people and is banned in several countries: the anti-inflammatory Toradol.

Gordon Edes of ESPN Boston has a story about its use in baseball. The hook: an interview with Jonathan Papelbon who took it routinely when he was with the Red Sox but who was told by the Phillies that he can no longer take it as they do not allow it.  Edes looks into the controversial drug, notes its serious side effects, which can include internal bleeding (Clay Buchholz believes it’s what led to him contracting esophagitis which landed him in the ICU) and notes that it’s banned in several countries, for athletes and normal folks alike.

Papelbon’s description of its use in Major League Baseball is pretty familiar-sounding: it’s taken before the game to help guys “get through a 162 game season.” It’s, by definition, a performance enhancing drug. It’s letting guys do things they otherwise couldn’t do. Allowing their bodies to recover faster which allows them to train harder and compete at a more intense level than they otherwise could. Except it’s not on a banned list so no one cares despite the fact that it has the potential to kill you.

There is a tremendous disconnect between the drugs people think are awful in sports and the drugs that truly have the potential to be harmful. This is maybe the best example. Might be nice if we thought about our priorities about these things once in a while.

Yankees get into esports, announce investment partnership with Vision Esports

New York Yankees
Leave a comment

The Yankees have announced an investment partnership with Vision Esports. Vision Esports is the largest single shareholder of three esports-related companies, which includes Echo Fox, Twin Galaxies, and Vision Entertainment. The size of the investment was not disclosed.

Echo Fox was founded by former NBA player Rick Fox. The team has players from some of the most popular titles, including League of Legends, Call of Duty, Street Fighter, and Super Smash Bros.

Twin Galaxies tracks retro video game world records. Vision Entertainment creates esports content across various platforms.

This is not the first intersection of baseball and esports. Earlier this year, pitcher Trevor May joined esports team Luminosity. Other teams, particularly in the NBA, have gotten involved in esports. Last year, the Philadelphia 76ers acquired esports teams Dignitas and Apex.