Everything is about the Yankees

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Local TV news in small towns is great. Every story, no matter how unrelated to the area, is tied in locally somehow. “Tsunami in the Pacific! Stay tuned to Action4 to see what that means for you in Central Ohio!”  It’s the very essence of provincialism to look at something that has no connection to you but to stretch for connections.

But it’s not limited to small town TV news. It happens in the biggest of cities too. The back page of today’s New York Post:

source:

I haven’t read the Ken Davidoff article that crazy headline teases, but I’m going to assume a guy as smart as him doesn’t truly see the Hernandez story as bad news for the Yankees. How could it? Hernandez was not a free agent and there has never been a truly credible rumor that he was going to be traded there. If you asked Brian Cashman if the future of the Yankees hinged on them getting Felix Hernandez he’d look at you like you were an insane person.

Rather, this is pretty clearly an editorial diktat to make EVERYTHING about the Yankees if possible.  Or if impossible. Either way. And it feeds into the entitlement a certain brand of Yankees fan gets which is about the most tiresome thing in the world.

Oh, and then this pops up:

Never change, New York Post. Never change.

The deadline is 8 PM ET Monday for Shohei Ohtani situation to be resolved

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.