Everything is about the Yankees

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Local TV news in small towns is great. Every story, no matter how unrelated to the area, is tied in locally somehow. “Tsunami in the Pacific! Stay tuned to Action4 to see what that means for you in Central Ohio!”  It’s the very essence of provincialism to look at something that has no connection to you but to stretch for connections.

But it’s not limited to small town TV news. It happens in the biggest of cities too. The back page of today’s New York Post:

source:

I haven’t read the Ken Davidoff article that crazy headline teases, but I’m going to assume a guy as smart as him doesn’t truly see the Hernandez story as bad news for the Yankees. How could it? Hernandez was not a free agent and there has never been a truly credible rumor that he was going to be traded there. If you asked Brian Cashman if the future of the Yankees hinged on them getting Felix Hernandez he’d look at you like you were an insane person.

Rather, this is pretty clearly an editorial diktat to make EVERYTHING about the Yankees if possible.  Or if impossible. Either way. And it feeds into the entitlement a certain brand of Yankees fan gets which is about the most tiresome thing in the world.

Oh, and then this pops up:

Never change, New York Post. Never change.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.