Not all players named in the Biogenesis records should be treated the same

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Dayn Perry of CBS Sports.com makes an excellent freaking observation: despite having all of the Biogenesis records at its disposal, the Miami New Times limited its reporting of players’ names to those clearly associated with PEDs in the records. They redacted and did not report the names of Ryan Braun, Jhonny Peralta and those players named in the past few days by other outlets. They explain their reasoning here.

I agree with Dayn that this does not mean that those who have reported other names have acted irresponsibly. Indeed, every report (as opposed to secondary, hand-wringing opinion) has been careful to note that names like Braun’s appear in the records — a clear fact — but are not linked to specific PEDs.  At the same time, however, the mere fact that those names are there has cultivated suspicion and accusations regarding them that no matter what ever else arises out of all of this will forever associate them with a PED story.

Was the Miami New Times overly cautious? Maybe. But given how badly PED accusations stain players’ reputations, the caution seems well-warranted. And even if those names are going to inevitably come out, the distinction between those who are specifically linked to PEDs in the documents and those who are not is one that should be noted as often as possible.

The deadline is 8 PM ET Monday for Shohei Ohtani situation to be resolved

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.