Pirates sign Jonathan Sanchez to minor league deal

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Jonathan Sanchez will try to resurrect his career in Pittsburgh, agreeing to a minor-league deal with the Pirates that includes an invitation to spring training.

Once upon a time Sanchez looked like a very promising young left-hander, but control problems have consistently wrecked any chance he had of emerging as a front-line starter and he was an absolute mess last season with an 8.07 ERA in 65 innings for the Royals and Rockies.

Kansas City gave up Melky Cabrera to get Sanchez from San Francisco last offseason and then he walked more batters than he struck out, was traded to Colorado, and then shut down in August with arm problems.

Sanchez had a 3.75 ERA in 458 innings from 2009-2011, so he’s not that far removed from being a plenty useful pitcher, but last season was so bad that it’s tough to imagine a successful bounce back.

Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto reportedly asks to be traded

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Craig Mish of MLB Network Radio is reporting that Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto has requested a trade out of Miami. Jon Heyman is characterizing it as Realmuto telling the team that he “wouldn’t mind” a trade.

Either way, Realmuto has no power to force a trade. This isn’t the NBA or something. Still, it’s evidence of just how dreary a prospect remaining in Miami is for Marlins veterans in the wake of trades that sent Giancarlo Stanton to New York, Marcell Ozuna to St. Louis.

Realmuto, who will turn 27 just before the 2018 season, hit .278/.332/.451 with 17 homers, 65 RBI, and eight steals over 141 games this past season. He only has three years of service time and is arbitration eligible for the first time this offseason. He made just $562K in the 2017 and will get a big raise this year, but he’s still going to be underpaid based on his production. If the Marlins wanted to trade him, they’d get a nice return. Why they would want to trade him, I have no idea.

Expect more of this sort of thing as the Marlins slash payroll and make it clear that their immediate priorities are more about saving money and less about winning baseball games. Which may or may not be a valid goal for the team’s new owners, but is certainly a letdown for baseball players and fans.