Meanwhile, beat writers are demanding that Braun’s attorneys waive privilege

70 Comments

I assumed this morning that we’d see baseball writers playing lawyer today.  I didn’t expect we’d see a baseball writer playing malpracticing lawyer, but here we are with Tom Haudricourt, speaking to WTMJ in Milwaukee this morning:

“Ryan Braun’s explanation was that this was money (reportedly $20,000 to $30,000) owed Tony Bosch for consulting for his appeal of his positive drug test that he had overturned last winter.  This should be easily provable by Braun’s attorneys … They should have correspondence with Bosch, hiring him as a consultant, paying him as a consultant.  They should have their own records, so this is a good time for them to come forward and back their client…They should back it up with their proof and be done with it.”

If Bosch was a consultant — and one of Braun’s attorneys did admit that he spoke with Bosch, even if he said Bosch’s help was “negligible” — the communications between them are protected by the attorney-client privilege and by the work product privilege.  It would be an ethical violation and a grounds for discipline by the state bar for Braun’s attorneys to release such information. It would also give Braun the right to sue his own attorneys.

I’m pretty sure Tom Haudricourt would never demand that one of his colleagues in the press reveal his source or his reporter’s notes simply because the subject matter suddenly becomes interesting. In light of that I’m rather surprised that he’d so cavalierly demand that an attorney abandon his legal and ethical obligations like this.

Or it’s quite possible that Haudricourt has no idea what he’s talking about and his demand here is made out of ignorance of the legal system as opposed to his disregard for it.

Imagine that. From a baseball writer.

Dodgers feel optimistic about Corey Seager’s return in the World Series

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Dodgers pulled through the five-game Championship Series without Corey Seager, but they’re counting down the days until their prized slugger/shortstop can make his first World Series appearance. He still has a ways to go before he can return to the field, however. Bill Plunkett of the OC Register reports that while Seager has been hitting off a tee, taking soft toss and running the curves of the infield, he’ll need to practice hitting in a simulated game before he can rejoin the team next Tuesday.

The 23-year-old infielder went 3-for-15 with a triple and two RBI in the NLDS earlier this month. He was sidelined in Game 3 of the series after making a bad slide into second base and sustaining a lower back strain. Although he’s made fairly rapid progress in his recovery over the last two weeks, he’s not back at 100% just yet, and Roberts said he won’t make a final decision on his status until it gets closer to game time. Even if Seager makes a successful return to his starting position, the Dodgers may not get the same .295/.375/.479 hitter they relied on during the regular season.

Provided that everything goes smoothly over the next two days, though, there’s a decent chance Seager will find his way to the infield — or, at the very least, to the plate. “We’re very optimistic,” Roberts said Saturday. “Corey doesn’t want to be denied.”