Tigers, Max Scherzer agree at $6.725 million

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The Tigers settled at the midpoint with arbitration-eligible right-hander Max Scherzer on Monday, agreeing to a one-year, $6.725 million contract.

Scherzer asked for $7.4 million in arbitration, while the Tigers proposed a $6.05 million salary. He had been Detroit’s only remaining arbitration case.

The 28-year-old Scherzer busted out in the second half of last season, going 8-2 with a 2.69 ERA to finish 16-7 with a 3.74 ERA and 231 strikeouts in 187 2/3 innings. Only Justin Verlander struck out more batters in the AL, and no qualified starter in either league had a higher strikeout rate (Stephen Strasburg would have, but he just missed the 162-IP mark). He also went 1-0 with a 2.08 ERA in three postseason starts, fanning at least eight batters each outing.

Scherzer will be eligible for arbitration one more time next winter before hitting free agency following the 2014 campaign.

Yankees to hire Josh Bard as their new bench coach

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Aaron Boone has no experience as a coach or a manager at any level. As such, some have speculated that he’d hire a more seasoned hand as his bench coach as he begins his first season as Yankees manager. Someone like, say, Eric Wedge, who was a candidate for the job Boone got and who once managed Boone in Cleveland.

Nope. According to MLB.com’s Mark Feinsand, he’s going with Josh Bard.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone’s with the Indians in 2005. He’s not without coaching experience, having spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers’ bullpen coach, but he’s not that Gene Lamont/Don Zimmer-type we often see in the bench coach role.

Which is fine because different managers want different things from their bench coach. Some are strategy guys, helping with in-game decision making. Others are relationship guys who help managers understand all of the dynamics of the clubhouse while they’re worrying more about lineups and stuff. Others are trust guys, who can serve as the manager’s sounding board, among other things. Some are combinations of all of these things. As Feinsand notes in his story, Boone said at his introductory press conference that he’s looking for this:

“I want smart sitting next to me. I want confidence sitting next to me. I want a guy who can walk out into that room and as I talk about relationships I expect to have with my players, I expect that even to be more so with my coaching staff. Whether that is a guy with all kinds of experience or little experience. I am not concerned about that.”