The Yankees will be saved by Derek Jeter: “the transcendent one”

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If you thought we were past the Golden Age of Derek Jeter Deification, well, you just haven’t read Bob Raissman’s latest column in the Daily News. He has a suggestion as to how the Yankees can get past the latest A-Rod PED scandal:

The captain’s presence and persona are uplifting. They can cleanse any muck surrounding the organization. In order for fans to keep the faith, they need a reason to believe, a face they can trust. Jeter, the transcendent one, is that man.

If there is any doubt as to Raissman’s feelings here, note that in the previous paragraph he referred to Jeter as a “savior.” I’m assuming his first draft had “the” instead of “a” and capitalized “savior,” but it really doesn’t have to. He also recommends that the Yankees start working on a contract extension for Jeter now, with “face of the franchise” kickers. He suggests Jeter storylines should be pushed “ad nauseum.”

That’s well and good, but you know what will solve all of the problems people are imagining spinning out of the A-Rod thing? The Yankees winning baseball games. That’s what almost every Yankees fan cares about, full stop. This drama being played out in the media is interesting to those of us in the media, and it’s interesting as part of a larger conversation about PEDs in baseball.

But your average Yankees fan doesn’t need a “savior.” He or she wants to see the Yankees win a lot of baseball games.

Danny Farquhar taken to hospital after fainting in dugout

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White Sox reliever Danny Farquhar passed out in the dugout after completing his outing against the Astros on Friday evening. The cause of the incident has yet to be determined, but Farquhar was supervised by the club’s medical personnel and EMTs and regained consciousness before being taken to Rush University Medical Center for further treatment and testing. A diagnosis has not been announced by the team.

Farquhar pitched 2/3 of an inning in relief during Friday’s 10-0 loss to Houston. He was brought in to relieve James Shields in the top of the sixth inning and was immediately bested by George Springer, who belted a ground-rule double down the right field line and scored Brian McCann and Derek Fisher for the Astros’ sixth and seventh runs of the night. He recovered to strike out Jose Altuve, but was again punished with a two-run homer from Carlos Correa (his first of two), and induced a fly out to end the inning.

The 31-year-old righty pitched just 7 1/3 innings with the club prior to Friday’s performance, issuing four hits, three runs, two homers and eight strikeouts in seven appearances.