Baseball cannot, and will not, punish A-Rod any more than any other PED offender

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Tim Keown of ESPN suggests  that Bud Selig should drop the hammer on A-Rod so as to make an example out of him. In his words, to “make an honorary sacrifice” out of him. Among his suggestions:

… could A-Rod be suspended from the game long enough to effectively end his career? Just spitballing here, but could Selig make him the Pete Rose of PEDs and use A-Rod’s arrogant, repeated nose-thumbing of the best interests of the game to make him ineligible for the Hall of Fame? … If he has evidence, he can suspend Rodriguez — or, if you’d prefer, El Cacique — for 50 games or more.

No, he can’t. He can suspend him for 50 games. That’s it.

Yes, we know A-Rod admitted to past PED use in 2009, but he has never before tested positive under the Joint Drug Agreement nor has he previously been subject to discipline. There is nothing more crystal clear than the Joint Drug Agreement’s provision of a 50-game suspension for a first time offender under its auspices.  That is the discipline that Rodriguez is subject to if the allegations in the Miami New Times story are true, and that is the discipline he will receive. Any effort to do more than that will bring about a swift response from the union. It is a battle they would almost certainly win and win easily.

The only thing that makes A-Rod different from Freddy Galvis, Edinson Volquez, J.C. Romero or Dan Serafini is that (a) he makes a lot more money; and (b) a lot of people hate him.  That’s what’s motivating ideas like Keown’s here anyway.  A-Rod’s paycheck and unpoularity, however, does not change the terms of baseball’s Joint Drug Agreement. Please stop suggesting that it does.

Report: Red Sox expected to announce J.D. Martinez signing on Monday

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Tomorrow will mark a week since the Red Sox reportedly inked outfielder J.D. Martinez to a five-year, $110 million contract. The signing hasn’t been made official yet, however, due to an apparent medical issue. That will change tomorrow morning as the Red Sox have a press conference scheduled with Martinez where they’re expected to announce the signing at long last, Evan Drellich of NBC Sports Boston reports.

According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, the terms of the deal aren’t expected to change. Presumably, the Red Sox had some safeguards put into the contract to protect them against whatever spooked them with the results of Martinez’s physical.

Martinez, 30, was the top free agent hitter after batting .303/.376/.690 with 45 home runs and 104 RBI in 489 plate appearances last season with the Tigers and Diamondbacks. He has expressed an interest in continuing to play in the outfield, but MLB.com’s Ian Browne says he will get a majority of his playing time as a DH with the Red Sox. Hanley Ramirez will share first base with Mitch Moreland.