Quote of the Day: Jon Heyman weighs in on the A-Rod insurance claim meme

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Notice something? Every reporter who has sources with the Yankees is floating the “A-Rod could just quit and the Yankees could collect insurance money” line. Brace yourselves, but it’s almost as if these guys are parroting Randy Levine and Lonn Trost’s most desperate fever dreams rather than, you know, applying an ounce of critical thinking to the matter.

Like Jon Heyman:

Teams don’t insure a lot of position players but the Yankees wisely insured A-Rod’s record $275-million pact, and word is significant missed time could result in the Yankees recovering 80 percent of the bucks due A-Rod, provided the insurer doesn’t put up its own stink.

“Put up its own stink.”  Classic, complete with an implied “this is a great plan as long as those lame insurance companies don’t kill our buzz with their irrational objections.”

The implied “they might not put up their own stink” is great too. Because insurance companies love nothing more than to pay out nine-figure claims, made with dubious-at-best motives.  They wouldn’t fight this, nah never.  They’re always looking for a way to get the policyholder the money they ask for. Paying it forward and such.

God, I’m gonna go listen to “God Bless America” and cry patriotic tears now.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: