Great Moments in Health Insurance Claims for Injured Players

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From 2006, regarding Jeff Bagwell:

Attorneys for the Houston Astros filed a lawsuit in state district court here Monday afternoon against Connecticut General Life Insurance Co., claiming breach of contract because the insurer denied the Astros’ claim to recoup $15.6 million of injured first baseman Jeff Bagwell’s $17 million contract … The Astros filed the insurance claim late in January, a few days prior to the Jan. 31 deadline. On March 28, Connecticut General rejected the claim, contending Bagwell had not become more disabled since he played in the World Series in October 2005.

From 2003, regarding Randy Myers:

The club contended the famous insurance carrier acted in bad faith when it denied a claim by the Padres over whether the club was due $8 million compensation for the two seasons (1999-2000) that Myers was unable to play because of arm injuries … After filing a claim, the Padres heard nothing from the carrier for 16 months, according to court papers. Lloyd’s balked at paying the claim and, according to court papers, argued two apparently conflicting points. The insurer said that Myers’ disabling injury occurred in April 1999, after the insurance policy expired. Lloyd’s also contended that Myers’ health problems could have been diagnosed as early as 1993 before the policy was enacted.

But sure, even though insurance companies fight $8 million and $17 million claims for years, there is every reason to think that one wouldn’t fight a $114 million claim for A-Rod.  They’d clearly understand that paying up was in the best interest of the Yankees and their fans and do their duty, right?

(thanks to readers @GrandCards and Chris Garber for the links)

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.