Great Moments in Health Insurance Claims for Injured Players

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From 2006, regarding Jeff Bagwell:

Attorneys for the Houston Astros filed a lawsuit in state district court here Monday afternoon against Connecticut General Life Insurance Co., claiming breach of contract because the insurer denied the Astros’ claim to recoup $15.6 million of injured first baseman Jeff Bagwell’s $17 million contract … The Astros filed the insurance claim late in January, a few days prior to the Jan. 31 deadline. On March 28, Connecticut General rejected the claim, contending Bagwell had not become more disabled since he played in the World Series in October 2005.

From 2003, regarding Randy Myers:

The club contended the famous insurance carrier acted in bad faith when it denied a claim by the Padres over whether the club was due $8 million compensation for the two seasons (1999-2000) that Myers was unable to play because of arm injuries … After filing a claim, the Padres heard nothing from the carrier for 16 months, according to court papers. Lloyd’s balked at paying the claim and, according to court papers, argued two apparently conflicting points. The insurer said that Myers’ disabling injury occurred in April 1999, after the insurance policy expired. Lloyd’s also contended that Myers’ health problems could have been diagnosed as early as 1993 before the policy was enacted.

But sure, even though insurance companies fight $8 million and $17 million claims for years, there is every reason to think that one wouldn’t fight a $114 million claim for A-Rod.  They’d clearly understand that paying up was in the best interest of the Yankees and their fans and do their duty, right?

(thanks to readers @GrandCards and Chris Garber for the links)

Kenley Jansen’s consecutive saves streak ends at 34

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Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen gave up three runs in the top of the ninth inning during Sunday’s game against the Braves, blowing his first save since August 26 last season. He had converted 34 consecutive saves.

Jansen yielded back-to-back singles to lead off the ninth inning, staked to a 4-1 lead. After getting two outs, Matt Adams hit a three-run home run down the right field line to knot the game at four apiece.

After Sunday’s lackluster performance, Jansen is now 24-for-25 in save chances this season with a 1.49 ERA and a 62/2 K/BB ratio in 42 1/3 innings.

Zach Britton sets American League record with 55th consecutive save

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Orioles closer Zach Britton finished Sunday’s 9-7 victory over the Astros with a scoreless ninth inning, earning his sixth save of the season. He has now earned the save in 55 consecutive opportunities dating back to September 2015, setting a new American League record. Tom Gordon previously held the record with 54 consecutive saves. Eric Gagne holds the major league record at 84.

Britton’s last blown save came on September 20, 2015, then converted two more saves before the end of the regular season. He went 47-for-47 in save chances last season and is six-for-six so far this year.

Along with his six saves, Britton has a 2.65 ERA and a 13/8 K/BB ratio in 17 innings this season. The lefty came off the disabled list earlier this month after missing two months with a strained left forearm.