Great Moments in Health Insurance Claims for Injured Players

15 Comments

From 2006, regarding Jeff Bagwell:

Attorneys for the Houston Astros filed a lawsuit in state district court here Monday afternoon against Connecticut General Life Insurance Co., claiming breach of contract because the insurer denied the Astros’ claim to recoup $15.6 million of injured first baseman Jeff Bagwell’s $17 million contract … The Astros filed the insurance claim late in January, a few days prior to the Jan. 31 deadline. On March 28, Connecticut General rejected the claim, contending Bagwell had not become more disabled since he played in the World Series in October 2005.

From 2003, regarding Randy Myers:

The club contended the famous insurance carrier acted in bad faith when it denied a claim by the Padres over whether the club was due $8 million compensation for the two seasons (1999-2000) that Myers was unable to play because of arm injuries … After filing a claim, the Padres heard nothing from the carrier for 16 months, according to court papers. Lloyd’s balked at paying the claim and, according to court papers, argued two apparently conflicting points. The insurer said that Myers’ disabling injury occurred in April 1999, after the insurance policy expired. Lloyd’s also contended that Myers’ health problems could have been diagnosed as early as 1993 before the policy was enacted.

But sure, even though insurance companies fight $8 million and $17 million claims for years, there is every reason to think that one wouldn’t fight a $114 million claim for A-Rod.  They’d clearly understand that paying up was in the best interest of the Yankees and their fans and do their duty, right?

(thanks to readers @GrandCards and Chris Garber for the links)

Report: Twins sign Erick Aybar to a minor-league deal

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Twins have reportedly signed free agent shortstop Erick Aybar to a minor-league deal, LaVelle E. Neal III of the Star Tribune reported Friday. FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman adds that the deal comes with a potential $1.25 million if Aybar reaches the majors, with additional incentives based on plate appearances. He’ll be able to opt out on March 27. The team has yet to confirm the signing.

Aybar, 34, is now four years removed from his career year in 2014. He’s been in a state of steady decline since then, slashing just .234/.300/.348 with seven home runs and 11 stolen bases over 370 plate appearances for the Padres in 2017. His poor performance wasn’t helped by a fractured left foot, either, which cost him almost six weeks on the disabled list.

Still, the Twins see something promising in the veteran infielder, and reportedly intend to use him as another utility option this spring. Per Neal, Aybar will join fellow backup infielders Eduardo Escobar and Ehire Adrianza and may even (temporarily) take over for Miguel Sano at third base if Sano isn’t able to shape up for the role by Opening Day.