The “the Yankees want to void A-Rod’s contract” stories are nothing more than red meat for angry fans

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The headline of this story from Andrew Marchand and Wallace Matthews is sexy: “Yankees want A-Rod’s contract voided.”  And this passage suggests a Yankees front office which is hellbent on doing so:

According to an industry source, the Yankees “are looking at about 20 different things,” including whether Rodriguez breached the contract by taking medical treatment from an outside doctor without the team’s authorization, and the possibility that he may have broken the law by purchasing controlled substances from a Miami “wellness clinic” run by nutritionist Anthony Bosch.

But read the whole article and you can tell that it’s a lost cause, and both Matthews and Marchand seem to know it too, as they note all of the obstacles to doing such a thing. Kudos to those two, actually, in that they are getting across what their sources are saying while not being unduly credulous.  Wish we saw more of that in the media.

Here’s the nut of it all, though:

Still, if Major League Baseball finds cause to discipline Rodriguez based on allegations made in a 5,400-word story published by The Miami New Times, the Yankees will try to find an escape hatch from their remaining five-year, $114 million obligation to the three-time American League MVP.

Know what happens if MLB finds cause to discipline A-Rod? He gets disciplined. Know what sets forth the discipline for a PED violation? The Joint Drug Agreement. Know what does not allow for voiding a contract for PED discipline? The Joint Drug Agreement.

Of course the Yankees want A-Rod’s contract voided. It’s a crappy contract.  They wanted Jason Giambi’s voided too and didn’t try to do it after exhausting their options.  Or at least appearing to exhaust them.  Which is what I think this really is:  red meat for the angry fans. The Yankees way of showing them and the talk radio hosts that they’re upset too and, man, how bad that A-Rod guy is.

But they know they can’t void the deal. There are no grounds to do so and no mechanism to do so.  But as long as this makes someone feel better for a while I suppose it’s OK.

 

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.