So who’s more important: the drug users or the drug dealers?


Following up on the whole discipline angle from the last post, it definitely seems like more is going to happen before there is either any legal action or baseball disciplinary action in the A-Rod case. I mean, last I checked we don’t prosecute people based on newspaper articles alone.

But what that next step is will be extremely interesting. Because it will tell us whether Major League Baseball and the DEA is more interested in drug users or drug dealers.

Back in the Mitchell Report days, MLB, George Mitchell and federal agents went to the drug dealers first and gave them various degrees of immunity. Why? Because no one cared about drug dealers. The Mitchell Report, as I wrote at length back in the day, was a public relations exercise and everyone involved wanted to get the names of PED-using players out in the open. The league wanted to look like it was taking action, George Mitchell wanted prestige and billable hours for his law firm and the feds wanted some big, celebrity heads on pikes.  This, by the way, is a lot of the reason why the lowest hanging fruit was picked back then and guys like A-Rod and Biogenesis went unmentioned.

But what now?  Once again we have MLB and the DEA pursuing PEDs. Based on the Miami New Times report, the next obvious move for law enforcement is to either get players like A-Rod, Nelson Cruz, Bartolo Colon, Gio Gonzalez and others in a room to talk about the clinic’s possibly illegal prescriptions or else to get the clinic’s operators in to talk about the users. That’s how the next phase of this has to go.

Will the DEA decide to pursue distributors or end users? Will MLB seek out the quickest means to get “just cause” suspension evidence on the players, or will it attempt to learn everything it can about what may very well be the biggest pipeline of drugs into its sport?

The choices that are made about all of this in the coming days will tell us a lot about the league’s and the feds’ priorities.

Clayton Kershaw completes spring training with a 0.00 ERA

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Clayton Kershaw had nothing left to prove when he exited the mound during his last Cactus League start on Friday. He finished camp with a 0.00 ERA, made all the more impressive after he extended his scoreless streak to 21 1/3 innings following 6 2/3 frames of one-hit ball against the Royals.

In six spring training starts this year, the Dodgers southpaw racked up 12 hits, four walks and 23 strikeouts. His velocity appeared to fluctuate between the high-80s and low-90s from start to start, but manager Dave Roberts told reporters that he expects Kershaw to get back up to the 93 m.p.h. range next week. Kershaw is tabbed for his eighth consecutive Opening Day start on Thursday.

The 30-year-old lefty is poised to enter his 11th season with the club in 2018. He went 18-4 in 27 starts last year and turned in a 2.31 ERA, 1.5 BB/9 and 10.4 SO/9 over 175 innings. He suffered his fair share of bumps and bruises along the way, including a lower back strain that required a five-week stay on the disabled list.

The Dodgers will open their season against the Giants on Thursday, March 29 at 7:08 PM ET. Given the sudden rash of injuries that hit the Giants’ rotation earlier today, Kershaw’s Opening Day opponent has not yet been announced.