So who’s more important: the drug users or the drug dealers?

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Following up on the whole discipline angle from the last post, it definitely seems like more is going to happen before there is either any legal action or baseball disciplinary action in the A-Rod case. I mean, last I checked we don’t prosecute people based on newspaper articles alone.

But what that next step is will be extremely interesting. Because it will tell us whether Major League Baseball and the DEA is more interested in drug users or drug dealers.

Back in the Mitchell Report days, MLB, George Mitchell and federal agents went to the drug dealers first and gave them various degrees of immunity. Why? Because no one cared about drug dealers. The Mitchell Report, as I wrote at length back in the day, was a public relations exercise and everyone involved wanted to get the names of PED-using players out in the open. The league wanted to look like it was taking action, George Mitchell wanted prestige and billable hours for his law firm and the feds wanted some big, celebrity heads on pikes.  This, by the way, is a lot of the reason why the lowest hanging fruit was picked back then and guys like A-Rod and Biogenesis went unmentioned.

But what now?  Once again we have MLB and the DEA pursuing PEDs. Based on the Miami New Times report, the next obvious move for law enforcement is to either get players like A-Rod, Nelson Cruz, Bartolo Colon, Gio Gonzalez and others in a room to talk about the clinic’s possibly illegal prescriptions or else to get the clinic’s operators in to talk about the users. That’s how the next phase of this has to go.

Will the DEA decide to pursue distributors or end users? Will MLB seek out the quickest means to get “just cause” suspension evidence on the players, or will it attempt to learn everything it can about what may very well be the biggest pipeline of drugs into its sport?

The choices that are made about all of this in the coming days will tell us a lot about the league’s and the feds’ priorities.

Buster Posey thinks Hector Neris hit him on purpose

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Giants catcher Buster Posey was hit by a pitch in the bottom of the eighth inning during Sunday afternoon’s series finale against the Phillies. It was a first-pitch fastball from closer Hector Neris, who had just entered the game. The Giants then had the bases loaded, but Pablo Sandoval struck out to end the inning and the Giants went on to lose 5-2.

After the game, Posey said he thinks Neris hit him on purpose, per Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle. Posey thinks Neris thought he couldn’t get him out.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, Neris said “absolutely not” when asked if he threw at Posey on purpose. The rest of the Phillies clubhouse, per Zolecki, “Say whaaat?!”

Here’s a link to the video of Posey getting hit. Now that we have automatic intentional walks, pitchers don’t even have to risk throwing four pitches wide of the strike zone to intentionally walk a hitter, so if Neris felt he couldn’t get Posey out, there was still no need to hit him. Furthermore, Neris isn’t going to hit Posey to load the bases and put the go-ahead run on first in a 4-2 ballgame. Sandoval has been a much worse hitter than Posey, for sure, but Neris would lose the platoon advantage if he felt like facing Sandoval instead, anyway.

Getting hit hurts, so it’s understandable Posey may have been salty in the moment. But after the game, when the pain has subsided and he’s had time to think over everything, there’s no way Posey should still come to the conclusion that Neris was trying to hit him on purpose.

Bartolo Colon has now beaten all 30 major league teams

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The Twins backed starter Bartolo Colon with plenty of offense on Sunday afternoon against the Diamondbacks, scoring nine runs in the first en route to a 12-5 victory. Colon pitched six innings, yielding four runs on seven hits and two walks with six strikeouts.

In earning the win on Sunday, Colon became the 18th pitcher to have beaten all 30 major league teams. The others: Al Leiter, Kevin Brown, Terry Mulholland, Curt Schilling, Woody Williams, Jamie Moyer, Randy Johnson, Barry Zito, A.J. Burnett, Javier Vazquez, Vicente Padilla, Derek Lowe, Dan Haren, Kyle Lohse, Tim Hudson, John Lackey, and Max Scherzer.

Colon had failed to earn the win in his previous four attempts against the Diamondbacks. One start came in 2006, one in 2015, and two last season.

There are currently nine active pitchers on the precipice of beating all 30 teams. Their names and the teams they’ve yet to beat: CC Sabathia (Marlins), Zack Greinke (Royals), Ervin Santana (Brewers), Ubaldo Jimenez (Rockies), Francisco Liriano (Marlins), J.A. Happ (Dodgers), Scott Kazmir (Brewers), Jon Lester (Red Sox), Edwin Jackson (Braves). Additionally, R.A. Dickey has yet to beat the Rockies and Cubs, Joe Blanton hasn’t beaten the Yankees and Athletics, and Jake Arrieta is winless against the Cubs and Mariners.