Mariners agree to one-year, $1.5M deal with Kelly Shoppach

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From MLB.com beat writer Greg Johns comes word that the Mariners have reached agreement on a major league contract with catcher Kelly Shoppach. The deal is pending a physical, which is scheduled to take place on Wednesday morning in Seattle.

Shoppach, a 32-year-old native of Fort Worth, Texas, batted .233/.309/.425 with eight homers, 14 doubles and 27 RBI over 245 plate appearances last season between the Red Sox and Mets. He will serve as an active backup in Seattle behind Jesus Montero, who is expected to continue getting regular starts at designated hitter in 2013.

There’s no word yet on the exact financial terms of Shoppach’s major league pact.

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UPDATE, 7:15 PM: The one-year deal carries a $1.5 million base salary and another $500,000 worth of performance-based incentives, according to ESPN.com’s Jerry Crasnick.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.