Will Middlebrooks thinks Mike Napoli is going to be fine

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Mike Napoli was diagnosed with avascular necrosis in both hips during his pre-signing physical with the Red Sox, but he hasn’t experienced any problems related to the disease up to this point and received a rave review Saturday afternoon from new teammate and offseason workout partner Will Middlebrooks.

“Not at all,” the Red Sox third baseman told WEEI when asked if Napoli has shown any signs of being hindered by the condition. “It doesn’t hurt him, and he’ll tell you the same thing. It’s just one of those things that’s tough because he doesn’t have any of the symptoms, but it’s there. He’s awesome. He’s fun to be around. He’s been one of my main hitting partners during the past month. He’s going to be great for this clubhouse.”

Napoli was originally offered a three-year, $39 million free agent contract from the Red Sox front office, but that was later shifted to a one-year, $5 million deal. He will start at first base for Boston in 2013.

Doctors believe they caught Napoli’s AVN early enough to prevent it from causing long-term issues.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.