The Hall of Fame might be broken, but not in the way you think it is


As a part of my friend Michael Clair’s charity blog-a-thon, I wrote about how Hall of Fame voting might — might, not definitely — be broken. But not in quite the way a lot of people have been saying over the past couple of weeks.  Rather, it’s turning into weird, divisive and gridlocked politics much akin to what goes down in Congress. You can read it in its entirety over at Old Time Family Baseball. An excerpt:

Congress has always been nasty, but there were always matters which were subject to logrolling and compromise which didn’t necessarily become points on which the parties would choose to do battle.  Now nearly every topic, no matter how far removed from the main planks of either party’s platform, sees the same level of polarization and combat that the bigger social issues and battles over entitlements typically occasion. I mean, lawmakers now consider basic empirical facts to be the subject of political argument for crying out loud. The previously non-political is increasingly becoming political.

Might things be heading in that direction in baseball?

Click through to see the answer to that question.

And again, it’s for a good cause. The charity blog-a-thon for which that bit was written, is to support Doctors Without Borders. It ends soon, but for the past 24 hours Michael has been running guest posts by all kinds of great baseball writers. It’s great stuff, so by all means, check it out and consider a donation.

Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.