Today is the deadline for exchanging arbitration figures

5 Comments

We’ve seen a lot of “Team and Player agree to one year deal, avoiding arbitration” stories this week. The reason: today is the deadline for all arbitration-eligible players and their teams to exchange salary figures.

For those who forgot or never knew, the arbitration-eligible players say they’re worth $X. The teams says they’re worth $Y, with $X and $Y being set as of today. If they can’t agree to a deal between now and their arbitration hearing date — with the hearings taking place between February 4 and February 20 — the arbitration panel will pick one of the two numbers. There is no in between.

Most players and teams will come to an agreement avoiding an arbitration hearing. There can be an in between for negotiated resolutions. In these cases, the agreements will almost always be around the mid-point between the player’s number and the team’s number.

Some teams, however, are what they call “file and trial” teams, meaning that as a matter of team policy, they will not negotiate after arbitration figures are filed, preferring to let the arbitrators sort it out.  For them, today is the drop-dead day. If they don’t hammer out a deal with their players, they are going to arbitration. In the past, file-and-trial teams have included the White Sox, Marlins, Rays and Braves.

Anyway, that’s what’s happening with all of these arbitration-avoiding deals.

Yankees sign Adam Lind to a minor league deal. Again.

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Yankees signed Adam Lind to a minor league deal this past offseason. Then they released him during spring training. Now they have signed him to another minor league deal. He’ll report to extended spring training where he’ll now try not to get extended released.

Lind is a platoon guy with little defensive value, but he hit .303/.362/.513 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 301 plate appearances for the Nationals last season, serving as a pinch-hitter and backup first baseman and outfielder. The injury to Greg Bird and the impending suspension of Tyler Austin — he’s currently on appeal — will likely give him at least some opportunity to show that he’s still a big leaguer.

Which, yeah, he probably still is. Or at least would be if teams didn’t have 13 and 14-man pitching staffs and actually had room for a couple of bench position players. Such is not the current game of baseball, however.