The WBC in a nutshell: Panamanian pitcher wants to play for China

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Despite a lot of people assuming that he’s Asian based on the name, Bruce Chen is second generation Panamanian. But he wants to pitch for China in the WBC. Which is leading to some logistical issues, reports Pete Grathoff of the KC Star:

Any questions about a player’s eligibility for a country must be cleared by the World Baseball Classic, Inc. Chen was asked to present his birth certificate, along with his parents’ and his grandparents’.

“It was very difficult,” Chen said. “I’m talking about 60, 70 years ago, and we cannot find the Chinese one. That’s in China, 70 years ago, I don’t even know how they recorded that. When they moved to Panama, they were not thinking, ‘Let me bring my birth certificate from China.’

Chen pitched for Panama for the past two WBCs.

I’m not the biggest WBC fan, but I kind of like this aspect of it. If I was a baseball player I’d get to pick (presumably) between team USA, team Ireland, team England, team Romania — they have that, right? — and depending on whether mere names as opposed to actual blood was enough, team Italy (it’s complicated).

Probably have to go with team Romania. That would probably be the most fun team.

Watch: George Springer robs Todd Frazier with an incredible catch at the wall

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Perhaps there are a few who still miss the slope of Tal’s Hill rising from center field, but George Springer isn’t one of them. He lassoed a 403-foot fly ball from Todd Frazier in the seventh inning of Game 6, reaching nearly to the top of the wall to prevent the Yankees from gaining on the Astros’ 3-0 lead.

According to Statcast, a fly ball with an exit velocity of 103.6 MPH and a launch angle of 29 degrees lands for a home run 72% of the time. That wasn’t going to fly with the Astros, who were facing runners on first and second with one out and saw Justin Verlander‘s pitch count rapidly approaching 100.

It wasn’t long before the Yankees tried for another home run, however, and this one sailed far above the heads of all of the Astros’ outfielders. Aaron Judge lofted a 425-foot shot to left field in the eighth inning, destroying a first-pitch fastball from Brad Peacock and finally getting New York on the board.

The Yankees currently trail the Astros 4-1 in the bottom of the eighth.