Joe Posnanski’s BBWAA Hall of Fame project

34 Comments

Posnanski makes a good point: there really are two Hall of Fames. (1) the BBWAA Hall of Fame, consisting of players voted in by the writers; and (2) the other Hall of Fame, consisting of managers, umpires, old timers, deadballers and players that the BBWAA didn’t think made the cut, voted in by various incarnations of the Veterans Committee and other ad hoc electorates set up from time to time over the past 70 or 80 years.

This is significant inasmuch as, if you argue what Hall of Fame standards are, you have to acknowledge that you are talking about two very, very different standards. With the BBWAA standard, I think we can all agree, being considerably higher than that of the various Veterans Committees.  To that end, Posnanski is taking the next couple of days to try to isolate the BBWAA Hall of Fame standard:

I’ll go through the BBWAA inductees — position by position using WAR to see where the BBWAA standard is — and then look and how the players on this year’s ballot match up. Like I say, I’ve been pretty surprised. It won’t change my voting because, like I said, I’m a big Hall guy. But I do think it might help clarify what happened this year with the BBWAA. I think the steroid mess was only a part of it.

He starts with first basemen here, and begins with talking about why and how he’s using WAR.

Overall I think this is worth doing because, however satisfying it is for us to say things like “how can you not let Player X in the Hall when Player Y is already in,” it’s a little disingenuous to do so when X is being considered by the tougher-grading BBWAA and Y was admitted to the Hall by Frankie Frisch’s crazy-permissive Veteran’s Committee in the 70s or whatever.

Albert Pujols hit his 597th career home run

Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
3 Comments

Angels DH Albert Pujols smacked his 597th career home run, a two-run shot in the top of the first inning during Wednesday night’s 5-2 loss to the Rays. The blast was off of Erasmo Ramirez and marked No. 6 on the season for the future Hall of Famer.

Pujols finished 1-for-3 with the homer and a walk. After Wednesday’s game, he’s hitting a lackluster .244/.296/.378 with 34 RBI and 14 runs scored in 186 trips to the plate.

Pujols currently ranks ninth on baseball’s all-time leaderboard and is three shy of joining the 600-homer club. He’s currently 13 home runs away from tying Sammy Sosa for eighth all-time.

Chris Sale’s streak of starts with at least 10 strikeouts ends

Adam Glanzman/Getty Images
1 Comment

Red Sox starter Chris Sale entered Wednesday’s outing against the Rangers with at least 10 strikeouts in eight consecutive starts, tying a record he already shared with Pedro Martinez. He failed do break the record, racking up only six strikeouts in 7 1/3 innings. Fortunately, the Red Sox scored seven runs in the bottom of the seventh to put him in line for the win. Sale gave up four runs (three earned) on six hits and a walk.

After Wednesday’s outing, Sale is sitting on a 2.34 ERA with a 101/14 K/BB ratio in 73 innings. So far, so good for the Red Sox, who acquired Sale from the White Sox in December.

Sale previously racked up 10 strikeouts in eight consecutive games between May 23 and June 30 in 2015 with the White Sox. Pedro Martinez accomplished the feat for the Red Sox between August 19 and September 27 in 1999.