Geoff Blum takes broadcasting job with Astros

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Veteran infielder Geoff Blum hasn’t formally retired from baseball, but that’s probably coming soon. Here’s MLB.com beat writer Brian McTaggart:

Geoff Blum, who played five years with the Astros in two separate stints with the club, has reached an agreement to join the club’s television broadcast team, a source has told MLB.com.

Blum is expected to be behind the microphone for about 60 games a year this year, filling the role of color analyst when Bill Brown isn’t in the booth.

Blum appeared in only 17 games — and started just five — with the Diamondbacks last season because of a serious left oblique injury.

And he hit .143 with a .336 OPS when he wasn’t on the disabled list.

The California native tallied 990 hits, 99 home runs and 479 RBI over the course of his 14-year major league career. He has big shoes to fill in Houston, where he’ll play a part in replacing fan favorite Jim Deshaies, who took a job in the Cubs’ television broadcast booth earlier this offseason. Blum is 39 years old.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.