Reminder: There are already steroids users in the Hall of Fame


Today, when the BBWAA elects either no one or, at best, two of over a dozen deserving candidates into the Hall of Fame, a lot of people will say they’re OK with that because it’s better to err on the side of caution than it is to allow a PED user to enter Cooperstown’s hallowed halls.  When they say this, remind them of the following passage from page 28 of the Mitchell Report:

In 1973, a Congressional subcommittee announced that its staff had completed an “in depth study into the use of illegal and dangerous drugs in sports” including professional baseball.  The subcommittee concluded that “the degree of improper drug use – primarily amphetamines and anabolic steroids – can only be described as alarming.”

Then remember — via Larry Granillo of Wezen-Ball from back in 2010 — that one Hall of Fame voter, Thomas Boswell of the Washington Post, has already said that he knows a current Hall of Famer used steroids. He said it on camera, in Ken Burns’ motherf—ing “Tenth Inning”:

“There was another player now in the Hall of Fame who literally stood with me and mixed something and I said “What’s that?” and he said “it’s a Jose Canseco milkshake”. And that year that Hall of Famer hit more home runs than ever hit any other year. So it wasn’t just Canseco, and so one of the reasons that I thought that it was an important subject was that it was spreading. It was already spreading by 1988.”

Steroid use in baseball was “alarming” as of 1973.  As of 1988 a guy who is now in the Hall of Fame was taking “Jose Canseco milkshakes,” which clearly meant steroids.

There is nothing left to protect. The “caution” that will be lauded today when so many worthy candidates fail to be elected will be empty and meaningless at best, active perpetuation of a double standard at worst.

Giancarlo Stanton stared down Derek Jeter and Michael Hill to get to New York

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Everyone knows that Giancarlo Stanton is now a New York Yankee. Everyone knows the Marlins traded him to New York. Most people also know that, before that trade happened, the Cardinals and Giants had deals in place for Stanton that he rejected via his no-trade clause. Now, for the first time, we get some real flavor of how all of that went down from Stanton’s perspective, courtesy of this profile of Stanton’s eventful offseason from Ben Reiter of Sports Illustrated.

The best part of it comes when Derek Jeter and Marlins president Michael Hill had a sit down with Stanton while the Giants and Cardinals offers were pending. In that meeting, Reiter reports, Stanton was told in no uncertain terms that he’d either accept one of those deals or else he’d be stuck in Miami while the roster was dismantled. Stanton responded thusly:

“This is not going to go how you guys think it will go,” Stanton said. “I’m not going to be forced somewhere, on a deadline, just because it’s convenient for you guys. I’ve put up with enough here. Derek, I know you don’t fully understand where I’m coming from. But Mike does. He’s been here. He can fill you in. This may not go exactly how I planned. But it’s definitely not going to go how you have planned.”

Even adjusting for the likelihood that it wasn’t put quite as smoothly as that in real time as it was in Stanton’s recollection of it to Reiter, it’s still pretty badass. Stanton had the power in that situation and he did not blink when the club threatened to call his bluff. In the end, he got what he wanted.

Beyond that, it’s a good profile of Stanton as he’s about to begin his Yankees career. Definitely worth your time.