One very shallow Hall of Fame thought

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Nothing else is going on, so here’s a really shallow Hall of Fame thought:

I think it’s almost certain — like, 99.9% certain — that there is already a member of the Hall of Fame who used performance enhancing drugs. Not just greenies, but 1980s-90s-2000s-style steroids, HGH and all of that stuff that causes everyone so much consternation.  I even have a couple of ideas of players who may have — guys who aren’t normally mentioned in these conversations — though I won’t say their names for risk that someone take my baseless speculation as some sort of actual information, which it is not.

But if I had a genie who granted me three wishes, I’d use one of the wishes to wish for a million more wishes. Then, with one of those million more wishes, I’d wish that one of those Hall of Fame players announce today that, yes, he was juiced to the gills. No apologies, no explanations, just a “yeah, I was totally ‘roided up,” after which he drops the mic and goes back to hunting, fishing, signing autographs and whatever else he does in his retirement.

Wouldn’t it just make everyone’s head explode?

And while it is a shallow thought, it’s not just some hypothetical thing. Because one day we’re going to learn about a Hall of Famer who used PEDs, at which point one of the leading arguments against voting in the Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens of the world is going to make even less sense than it already does.

In the playoffs, the Yankees’ weakness has become their strength

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Two weeks ago, when the playoffs began, the idea of “bullpenning” once again surfaced, this time with the Yankees as a focus. Because their starting pitching was believed to be a weakness — they had no obvious ace like a Dallas Keuchel or Corey Kluber — and their bullpen was a major strength, the idea of chaining relievers together starting from the first inning gained traction. The likes of Luis Severino, who struggled mightily in the AL Wild Card game, or Masahiro Tanaka (4.79 regular season ERA) couldn’t be relied upon in the postseason, the thought went.

That idea is no longer necessary for the Yankees because the starting rotation has become the club’s greatest strength. Tanaka fired seven shutout innings to help push the Yankees ahead of the Astros in the ALCS, three games to two. They are now one win away from reaching the World Series for the first time since 2009.

It hasn’t just been Tanaka. Since Game 3 of the ALDS, Yankees pitchers have made eight starts spanning 46 1/3 innings. They have allowed 10 runs (nine earned) on 25 hits and 12 walks with 45 strikeouts. That’s a 1.75 ERA with an 8.74 K/9 and 2.33 BB/9. In five of those eight starts, the starter went at least six innings, which has helped preserve the freshness and longevity of the bullpen.

Here’s the full list of performances for Yankee starters this postseason:

Game Starter IP H R ER BB SO HR
AL WC Luis Severino 1/3 4 3 3 1 0 2
ALDS 1 Sonny Gray 3 1/3 3 3 3 4 2 1
ALDS 2 CC Sabathia 5 1/3 3 4 2 3 5 0
ALDS 3 Masahiro Tanaka 7 3 0 0 1 7 0
ALDS 4 Luis Severino 7 4 3 3 1 9 2
ALDS 5 CC Sabathia 4 1/3 5 2 2 0 9 0
ALCS 1 Masahiro Tanaka 6 4 2 2 1 3 0
ALCS 2 Luis Severino 4 2 1 1 2 0 1
ALCS 3 CC Sabathia 6 3 0 0 4 5 0
ALCS 4 Sonny Gray 5 1 2 1 2 4 0
ALCS 5 Masahiro Tanaka 7 3 0 0 1 8 0
TOTAL 55 1/3 35 20 17 20 52 6

In particular, if you hone in on the ALCS starts specifically, Yankee starters have pitched 28 innings, allowing five runs (four earned) on 13 hits and 10 walks with 20 strikeouts. That’s a 1.61 ERA.

While the Yankees’ biggest weakness has become a strength, the Astros’ biggest weakness — the bullpen — has become an even bigger weakness. This is why the Yankees, who won 10 fewer games than the Astros during the regular season, are one win away from reaching the World Series and the Astros are not.