Baseball is still number two, but here comes college football

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One of the reasons today is such a slow news day baseball-wise is because the sporting world is focused on tonight’s Alabama-Notre Dame game. It’s a focus that mirrors the increasing popularity of college football. Which, some say, may soon overtake baseball as the nation’s second most popular sport.

Baseball still has more viewers — 48% of adults watched an MLB game as opposed to 39% watching college football — but college football is gaining ground:

Other research indicates the Grand Old Game is still No. 2. But the power and pageantry of college football is grabbing younger consumers. Numbers are trending in the direction of college football. In the latest Harris Poll, 16% of adults cited baseball as their favorite sport, compared to 11% for college football. Baseball’s actually up three points from last year, when the two sports were tied at 13% while college football dropped two points. But since Harris started tracking America’s favorite sports in 1985, college football has gained 1%, while baseball has gone down 7%.

You know my take on this. Who cares? Bud Light sells more than Stone IPA and Justin Bieber sells more than Neil Young and yet I still like what I like, you like what you like and so to shall it always be with sports.

But it is interesting to see the surge of college football, especially given the public hits it has taken in recent years, what with scandals and greater reporting of its excesses and its corruption. Fans don’t care. They like the product and, our different tastes and the hand-wringing of some aside, there is no reason why they shouldn’t.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.