Dodgers “50-50” between Fox Sports and Time Warner for new television deal

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Fox Sports have long been considered the favorites to work out the oft-mentioned mega TV deal with the Dodgers, but Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times hears that an agreement between the two sides is no longer a slam dunk.

Whether the Dodgers keep their television broadcasts on Fox Sports or move them to Time Warner Cable appears to be a “50-50” proposition, according to a person familiar with the team’s TV negotiations but not authorized to discuss them.

The Dodgers remain in discussions with Fox and TWC, according to two people familiar with the talks. The Fox exclusive negotiating period expired five weeks ago.

At the time, the Dodgers and Fox were negotiating a deal that could have been worth at least $6 billion over 25 years. However, no deal has been finalized, in part because the Dodgers prefer to avoid a U.S. Bankruptcy Court showdown with Major League Baseball over the structure of the deal.

In the interim, the Dodgers appear increasingly intrigued with the wide latitude TWC might be able to provide for all-day programming — for the team, and perhaps for other entertainment assets of Guggenheim Partners. Mark Walter, the Dodgers’ controlling owner, is chief executive of Guggenheim Partners, which controls Dick Clark Productions.

In a nutshell, there’s disagreement over whether the Dodgers will end up contributing either around $1 billion or $2 billion to MLB’s revenue sharing program, so they are looking at alternative ways to structure a deal that will allow them to keep as much money as possible while making MLB (and the court) happy. As Craig pointed out last month, the difference between these two figures represent more than most teams get for their entire television deal. Some world they are living in.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.