The Mets want Major League Soccer in Citi Field, MLS says “no thanks”

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People in New York have been talking about building a Major League Soccer stadium in Queens. It’s apparently a controversial plan, and now the Mets are wading into the mess:

The Mets are “very interested and fully capable” of bringing Major League Soccer to Citi Field, City Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. (D-Astoria) announced Thursday. The move would boost the baseball team’s coffers and eliminate potential competition from a $300 million MLS soccer stadium proposed for Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

The Mets confirm that they’re on board with such a plan. Major League Soccer doesn’t like the idea, calling it a “non-starter.”

And it’s pretty understandable why. They’ve spent the past 15 years moving teams from inappropriate and ill-fitting football stadiums and the like into soccer-specific stadiums which (a) are way, way better for players and fans in terms of functionality and aesthetics; and (b) are way better for the league and team owners financially. Why, then, the league would want to put soccer in a baseball stadium with what one can only assume are the worst sight lines imaginable is beyond me.

Building a soccer stadium may not be a fantastic idea in and of itself — there is serious opposition to it there for a lot of understandable reasons — but cramming a soccer team in a major league ballpark makes very little sense.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.