The Mets want Major League Soccer in Citi Field, MLS says “no thanks”

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People in New York have been talking about building a Major League Soccer stadium in Queens. It’s apparently a controversial plan, and now the Mets are wading into the mess:

The Mets are “very interested and fully capable” of bringing Major League Soccer to Citi Field, City Councilman Peter Vallone Jr. (D-Astoria) announced Thursday. The move would boost the baseball team’s coffers and eliminate potential competition from a $300 million MLS soccer stadium proposed for Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

The Mets confirm that they’re on board with such a plan. Major League Soccer doesn’t like the idea, calling it a “non-starter.”

And it’s pretty understandable why. They’ve spent the past 15 years moving teams from inappropriate and ill-fitting football stadiums and the like into soccer-specific stadiums which (a) are way, way better for players and fans in terms of functionality and aesthetics; and (b) are way better for the league and team owners financially. Why, then, the league would want to put soccer in a baseball stadium with what one can only assume are the worst sight lines imaginable is beyond me.

Building a soccer stadium may not be a fantastic idea in and of itself — there is serious opposition to it there for a lot of understandable reasons — but cramming a soccer team in a major league ballpark makes very little sense.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”