Dillon Gee says surgery for blood clot has helped throwing

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Dillon Gee is looking forward to a healthy 2013.

The 26-year-old right-hander told New York Daily News beat writer Anthony McCarron in a recent phone interview that his winter workouts are going smoothly and that he feels looser and more natural when he throws since having a blood clot removed in mid-July from an artery near his pitching shoulder.

“One of the things with my surgery we were hoping for was, by recouping some of the blood flow I had lost, that my recovery would be better and that seems to be the case so far,” said Gee. “I’m excited. The doctor said he was surprised I could recover every five days as it was, with the lack of blood and oxygen, so hopefully that will make it that much easier to bounce back after every start. You never know what the future holds, but we have a lot of positive signs going.”

Gee posted a solid 4.10 ERA, 1.25 WHIP and 97/29 K/BB ratio across 109 2/3 innings this past season.

Alex Wood to try pitching out of the stretch

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Pedro Moura of The Athletic reports that Dodgers starter Alex Wood plans to pitch out of the stretch throughout the 2018 season. Wood got the idea when he watched Nationals starter Stephen Strasburg pitch against the Dodgers.

Wood, 27, finished last season 16-3 with a 2.72 ERA and a 151/38 K/BB ratio in 152 1/3 innings. That’s a mighty fine season, one in which many pitchers would not dare to mess with something that isn’t broken.

Interestingly, Wood indeed has had better results with runners on base — when he would pitch out of the stretch — as opposed to the bases being empty, with a respective OPS allowed of .523 versus .684, respectively. Over his career, he has allowed a .617 OPS with runners on and .706 with the bases empty.

In response to Moura’s tweet about Wood, retired pitchers Dan Haren and Jered Weaver took the opportunity to burn themselves. Haren tweeted, “I pitched a few seasons completely out of the stretch actually, just not by choice.” Weaver responded, “Sometimes I would just step off and throw the ball in the gap myself because I knew the hitter would do it anyways.”