Hall of Fame voter continues to write in Pete Rose because, um, it’s cold in April

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Really, that pretty much sums up this guy’s Hall of Fame column. Despite Pete Rose being ineligible and absent from the Hall of Fame ballot, Marc Maturo of the Rockland County Times — who has a Hall of Fame vote despite the fact he hasn’t covered baseball for 27 years — writes in Pete Rose’s name every year.

Why? Because how can baseball bar Pete Rose due to his lack of integrity when baseball itself lacks integrity? OK, I would at least give such a charge of hypocrisy a hearing. He starts with ticket prices being high, but ultimately all Maturo seems to be on about is how it gets cold in April and October:

And this is not to mention opening the season in weather better suited to curling than to baseball, and ending in weather also best suited to curling than to baseball. Baseball is, after all, “The Summer Game.” But don’t tell this to players seen in postseason dugouts sporting parkas, Trapper’s hats and arctic hand warmers; and don’t tell that to the very people who make it all possible, the suckers, er, fans, who also can be seen sporting Antarctic-like gear, wrapped wonderfully in blankets. Integrity my foot!

Also bugging him: no day games for the World Series. Then he goes back to complaining about “blizzard baseball.” Then he makes his pro-Pete Rose case. Starting with this:

If we have to depend on Rose’s word alone, there’s good reason to accept it.

Given that Rose has spent over two decades lying his hustling butt off, I’m not sure why that is, but go read Maturo’s column if you want to hear the case. It has mostly to do with the fact that Rose played hard and such.

Anyway, that’s the latest from the BBWAA and its strange rules which allow guys who haven’t covered baseball since the Reagan administration to vote for the Hall of Fame while denying that right to a huge number of active, working baseball writers.

Report: Diamondbacks acquire Steven Souza from Rays in part of three-team deal

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Update (6:35 PM ET): This is a three-team deal also involving the Diamondbacks, per Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic. The Diamondbacks will receive outfielder Steven Souza from the Rays and second baseman Brandon Drury will head to the Yankees. Lefty reliever Anthony Banda will go to the Rays, Piecoro adds. The Diamondbacks will also receive prospect Taylor Widener from the Yankees, per Joel Sherman of the New York Post.

Souza, 28, is earning $3.55 million in his first of three years of arbitration eligibility, so the Rays are presumably saving money in moving him. Last season, Souza hit a productive .239/.351/.459 with 30 home runs, 78 RBI, 78 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 617 plate appearances. Souza’s arrival almost certainly pushes Yasmany Tomas out of a starting gig.

Drury, 25, has played a handful of positions in his brief major league career. Last year, he played second base in Arizona, batting .267/.317/.447 with 13 home runs and 63 RBI in 480 PA.

Banda, 24, made his major league debut last season, posting an ugly 5.96 ERA with a 25/10 K/BB ratio in 25 2/3 innings. The peripherals suggest he pitched better than his ERA indicated.

Widener, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the 12th round of the 2016 draft. This past season with High-A Tampa, he pitched 119 1/3 innings and posted a 3.39 ERA with a 129/50 K/BB ratio. MLB Pipeline rated Widener as the 14th-best prospect in the Yankees’ system.

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Robert Murray of FanRag Sports reports that the Rays will acquire second base prospect Nick Solak from the Yankees. The Yankees’ return is presently not known.

Solak, 23, was selected by the Yankees in the second round of the 2016 draft. He spent last season between High-A Tampa and Double-A Trenton, hitting a combined .297/.384/.452 with 12 home runs, 53 RBI, 72 runs scored, and 14 stolen bases.

MLB Pipeline ranked Solak as the eighth-best prospect in the Yankees’ system and the fifth-best second base prospect in baseball, praising him for his ability to hit line drives as well as his speed.