Red Sox and Pirates finalize Joel Hanrahan trade

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An official announcement was delayed over Christmas, but the Red Sox and Pirates have now completed the trade sending reliever Joel Hanrahan to Boston.

Along with Hanrahan the Red Sox also receive Brock Holt, a 24-year-old shortstop with good on-base skills who debuted with the Pirates this year.

In exchange for Hanrahan and Holt the Pirates get first baseman/outfielder Jerry Sands, reliever Mark Melancon, and prospects Stolmy Pimentel and Ivan De Jesus.

Hanrahan has been one of the best relievers in baseball since 2010, posting a 2.73 ERA with 10.4 strikeouts per nine innings in 205 appearances, and he saved 76 games during the past three seasons. He’ll be a free agent next offseason.

Sands was acquired by the Red Sox from the Dodgers in the Adrian Gonzalez/Carl Crawford/Josh Beckett trade. He hasn’t hit much in the majors so far, but the 25-year-old has consistently had very strong production in the minors, including hitting .288 with 55 homers and a .914 OPS in 213 games at Triple-A.

Boston got Melancon from Houston last offseason for Jed Lowrie, but he quickly went from setup man to the minors after a brutal start. He returned in June and pitched well with a 4.19 ERA and 40/10 K/BB ratio in 43 innings, so the Pirates definitely bought low on a capable late-inning bullpen arm.

Neither Pimental nor De Jesus ranked among the Red Sox’s top 10 prospects according to Baseball America. De Jesus, who was also acquired in the Gonzalez/Crawford/Beckett swap, has spent most of the past three seasons at Triple-A and projects as a bench player in the majors at age 26. Pimentel spent this season at Double-A as a 22-year-old, throwing 116 innings with a 4.59 ERA and 86/42 K/BB ratio.

Nationals plan to activate Bryce Harper on Monday

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The Nationals are planning to activate Bryce Harper from the 10-day disabled list on Monday, Chelsea Janes of the Washington Post reports. Janes adds that Harper has been taking his knee injury on a day-to-day basis, so if he experiences pain ahead of tomorrow’s series opener in Philadelphia, then the Nationals won’t activate him.

Harper, 24, suffered a knee injury running out a grounder last month against the Giants. The Nationals hope to get him into some game action before the end of the regular season just so he can get acclimated in time for the playoffs.

When Harper returns, he’ll look to improve on his .326/.419/.614 slash line with 29 home runs, 87 RBI, and 92 runs scored in 472 plate appearances.

Here’s what Jackie Robinson had to say about the national anthem

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For a lot of people, athletes expressing their political viewpoints by protesting the national anthem is a relatively new concept. But the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Jackie Robinson is celebrated every year across baseball on April 15, marking the day he broke the color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. Robinson was an activist well beyond that momentous occasion, highlighting issues black athletes face as editor for Our Sports magazine. He openly criticized then-GM of the Yankees George Weiss on television for the lack of diversity on his team. He helped spur restaurants and hotels to serve black people by criticizing their segregation publicly. Robinson became the first black vice president of an American corporation when he joined coffee company Chock full o’Nuts, and he became the first black baseball analyst when he joined ABC’s Major League Baseball Game of the Week. Of course, Robinson was also the first black member of baseball’s Hall of Fame.

Robinson had an issue with the national anthem as well. As Deadspin’s Lindsey Adler pointed out, Robinson wrote about the anthem in his memoir, I Never Had It Made.

There I was the black grandson of a slave, the son of a black sharecropper, part of a historic occasion, a symbolic hero to my people. The air was sparkling. The sunlight was warm. The band struck up the national anthem. The flag billowed in the wind. It should have been a glorious moment for me as the stirring words of the national anthem poured from the stands. Perhaps it was, but then again perhaps the anthem could be called the theme song for a drama called The Noble Experiment. Today as I look back on that opening game of my first world series, I must tell you that it was Mr. Rickey’s drama and that I was only a principal actor. As I write this twenty years later, I cannot stand and sing the anthem. I cannot salute the flag; I know that I am a black man in a white world. In 1972, in 1947, at my birth in 1919, I know that I never had it made.

Robinson is referring to systemic power that has entrenched whiteness and ostracized blackness. Robinson may have ascended as one of the greatest players of all time and he may have broken the color barrier, but the league was still owned and run entirely by white people, which is what he meant by referring to himself as a “principal actor” in Branch Rickey’s “drama.” Rickey was the white executive who signed Robinson and supported him as the color barrier was broken. Robinson could not have done what he did without the aid of white people like Rickey who have the ability to leverage their systemic power.

Without question, Robinson would have supported the protests of Colin Kaepernick and many others who want to bring attention to the unfair ways in which black people interact with the police and the justice system. And it makes one realize that the people who purport to admire Robinson and his many accomplishments would have said the same things they say about Kapernick et. al. now to Robinson back in 1947. And to Muhammad Ali. And to John Carlos and Tommie Smith. The more things change, the more they stay the same.