Former Rangers owner Brad Corbett dies

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Former Texas Rangers owner Brad Corbett has died. The Long Island-born businessman who made his fortune selling PVC pip to the oil industry in Fort Worth owned the team from 1974 to 1980. He was 75.

Corbett’s tenure as Rangers’ owner was Steinbrennerian. He was the defacto GM. He signed a lot of free agents, but not many good ones, and traded for big names like Al Oliver and Bobby Bonds. He also went through a lot of managers, employing Billy Martin, Frank Lucchesi,  Eddie Stanky, Connie Ryan, Billy Hunter and Pat Corrales. Players came and went pretty darn fast in those days as well.

The team did, however, experience its most success up to that point during his stewardship, winning 94 games in 1977 and finishing above .500 four times. Ultimately, though, they were no match for the mid-to-late 70s Kansas City Royals and real success eluded the club.  Corbett sold the team in 1980.

Watch: George Springer robs Todd Frazier with an incredible catch at the wall

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Perhaps there are a few who still miss the slope of Tal’s Hill rising from center field, but George Springer isn’t one of them. He lassoed a 403-foot fly ball from Todd Frazier in the seventh inning of Game 6, reaching nearly to the top of the wall to prevent the Yankees from gaining on the Astros’ 3-0 lead.

According to Statcast, a fly ball with an exit velocity of 103.6 MPH and a launch angle of 29 degrees lands for a home run 72% of the time. That wasn’t going to fly with the Astros, who were facing runners on first and second with one out and saw Justin Verlander‘s pitch count rapidly approaching 100.

It wasn’t long before the Yankees tried for another home run, however, and this one sailed far above the heads of all of the Astros’ outfielders. Aaron Judge lofted a 425-foot shot to left field in the eighth inning, destroying a first-pitch fastball from Brad Peacock and finally getting New York on the board.

The Yankees currently trail the Astros 4-1 in the bottom of the eighth.