Former Rangers owner Brad Corbett dies

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Former Texas Rangers owner Brad Corbett has died. The Long Island-born businessman who made his fortune selling PVC pip to the oil industry in Fort Worth owned the team from 1974 to 1980. He was 75.

Corbett’s tenure as Rangers’ owner was Steinbrennerian. He was the defacto GM. He signed a lot of free agents, but not many good ones, and traded for big names like Al Oliver and Bobby Bonds. He also went through a lot of managers, employing Billy Martin, Frank Lucchesi,  Eddie Stanky, Connie Ryan, Billy Hunter and Pat Corrales. Players came and went pretty darn fast in those days as well.

The team did, however, experience its most success up to that point during his stewardship, winning 94 games in 1977 and finishing above .500 four times. Ultimately, though, they were no match for the mid-to-late 70s Kansas City Royals and real success eluded the club.  Corbett sold the team in 1980.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.