“Some days, the Reds’ usually frenetic utilityman would simply sit in his chair and stare into his locker…”

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Marc Lancaster served as the Reds beat writer for the Cincinnati Post from 2004-2006 and developed a close relationship with Ryan Freel, who was at the peak of his MLB career during those three seasons.

Freel, a husband to Christie and father to three daughters, took his life with a shotgun at his family home in Jacksonville, Florida on Saturday. And now Lancaster is offering a unique perspective on the kind of man Freel was and the sort of internal issues that he struggled with in a special remembrance for CBSSports.com:

It became almost a daily routine in the Cincinnati Reds’ clubhouse in the mid-2000s. Ryan Freel would do something, or say something, or a look a certain way, and those who were around him on a regular basis immediately could deduce whether “Good Freel” or “Bad Freel” had showed up to work that day.

The difference was stark. Some days, the Reds’ usually frenetic utilityman would simply sit in his chair and stare into his locker, not interacting with anyone about anything. Other days he would bounce around the room, greeting anyone in his path – teammates, clubhouse attendants, reporters – with over-the-top enthusiasm and occasionally a bear hug.

Head on over to Eye On Baseball and read the whole thing. We’ll steal just one last line:

As former major league outfielder Rocco Baldelli said on Twitter Saturday night“Lets pay better attention to the ones we love.”

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.