Zack Greinke, Ned Colletti, Magic Johnson

2013 Free Agency Tracker

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We’ll be updating this one throughout the offseason. Players are listed based on their ranking in the Top 111 Free Agents. At the bottom is a listing of free agents who signed before the ranking came out, and we’ll be adding signings of players who didn’t make the top 111 as they come in.

(Update: I’ve added non-tendered players to the Top 111 below, with ** indicating the new players).

Re-signings are posted in red, while players signing with new teams get blue.

1. Josh Hamilton (OF Rangers): Angels – 5 yrs, $125 mil
2. Zack Greinke (RHP Angels): Dodgers – 6 yrs, $147 mil
3. Anibal Sanchez (RHP Tigers): Tigers – 5 yrs, $80 mil + option
4. B.J. Upton (OF Rays): Braves – 5 yrs, $75.25 mil
5. Michael Bourn (OF Braves):
6. Kyle Lohse (RHP Cardinals):
7. Nick Swisher (OF Yankees): Indians – 4 yrs, $56 mil + vesting option
8. Edwin Jackson (RHP Nationals): Cubs – 4 yrs, $52 mil
9. David Ortiz (DH Red Sox): Red Sox – 2 yrs, $26 mil-$30 mil
10. Hiroki Kuroda (RHP Yankees): Yankees – 1 yr, $15 mil
11. Adam LaRoche (1B Nationals): Nationals – 2 yrs, $24 mil + mutual option
12. Mike Napoli (C-1B Rangers): Red Sox – 1 yr, $5 mil + incentives
13. Mariano Rivera (RHP Yankees): Yankees – 1 yr, $10 mil
14. Dan Haren (RHP Angels): Nationals – 1 yr, $13 mil
15. Ryan Dempster (RHP Rangers): Red Sox – 2 yrs, $26.5 mil
16. Torii Hunter (OF Angels): Tigers – 2 yrs, $26 mil
17. Rafael Soriano (RHP Yankees): Nationals – 2 yrs, $28 mil + vesting option
18. Andy Pettitte (LHP Yankees): Yankees – 1 yr, $12 mil
19. Shane Victorino (OF Dodgers): Red Sox – 3 yrs, $39 mil
20. Kevin Youkilis (3B White Sox): Yankees – 1 yr, $12 mil
21. Stephen Drew (SS Athletics): Red Sox – 1 yr, $9.5 mil
22. Shaun Marcum (RHP Brewers):
23. Angel Pagan (OF Giants): Giants – 4 yrs, $40 mil
24. Ryan Ludwick (OF Reds): Reds – 2 yrs, $15 mil + mutual option
25. Hisashi Iwakuma (RHP Mariners): Mariners – 2 yrs, $14 mil + option
26. A.J. Pierzynski (C White Sox): Rangers – 1 yr, $7.5 mil
27. Jeremy Guthrie (RHP Royals): Royals – 3 yrs, $25 mil
28. Cody Ross (OF Red Sox): Diamondbacks – 3 yrs, $26 mil + option
29. Marco Scutaro (2B Giants): Giants – 3 yrs, $20 mil
30. Shohei Otani (RHP Japan): Remaining in Japan with Nippon Ham
31. Jonathan Broxton (RHP Reds): Reds – 3 yrs, $21 mil
32. Russell Martin (C Yankees): Pirates – 2 yrs, $17 mil
33. Jeremy Affeldt (LHP Giants): Giants – 3 yrs, $18 mil
**. Mark Reynolds (1B Orioles): Indians – 1 yr, $6 mil
34. Delmon Young (OF Tigers): Phillies – 1 yr, $750,000 + $2.5 mil incentives
35. Ichiro Suzuki (OF Yankees): Yankees – 2 yrs, $13 mil
36. Brandon McCarthy (RHP Athletics): Diamondbacks – 2 yrs, $15.5 mil
37. Brett Myers (RHP White Sox): Indians – 1 yr, $7 mil + option
38. Kyuji Fujikawa (RHP Japan): Cubs – 2 yrs, $9.5 mil + vesting option
**: Brian Wilson (RHP Giants):
**. John Lannan (LHP Nationals): Phillies – 1 yr, $2.5 mil
39. Carlos Villanueva (RHP Blue Jays): Cubs – 2 yrs, $10 mil
40. Lance Berkman (1B Cardinals): Rangers – 1 yr, $11 mil + option
41. Sean Burnett (LHP Nationals): Angels – 2 yrs, $8 mil + $4.5 mil vesting option
42. Koji Uehara (RHP Rangers): Red Sox – 1 yr, $4.25 mil
43. Melky Cabrera (OF Giants): Blue Jays – 2 yrs, $16 mil
44. Joe Saunders (LHP Orioles):
45. Kelly Johnson (2B Blue Jays):
46. Ryan Madson (RHP Reds): Angels – 1 yr, $3.5 mil + $3.5 mil incentives
47. Francisco Liriano (LHP White Sox): Pirates – 2 yrs, $12.75 mil
48. Jose Valverde (RHP Tigers):
49. Mike Adams (RHP Rangers): Phillies – 2 yrs, $12 mil + vesting option
50. Roy Oswalt (RHP Rangers):
51. Jeff Keppinger (INF Rays): White Sox – 3 yrs, $12 mil
52. Joakim Soria (RHP Royals): Rangers – 2 yrs, $8 mil
53. Hiroyuki Nakajima (SS Japan): Athletics – 2 yrs, $6.5 mil
54. Brandon Lyon (RHP Blue Jays):
55. Joe Blanton (RHP Dodgers): Angels – 2 yrs, $15 mil + option
56. J.P. Howell (LHP Rays): Dodgers – 1 yr, $2.85 mil + $1.2 mil incentives
57. Scott Baker (RHP Twins): Cubs – 1 yr, $5.5 mil
58. Juan Pierre (OF Phillies): Marlins – 1 yr, $1.6 mil
59. Matt Lindstrom (RHP Rockies):
60. Maicer Izturis (INF Angels): Blue Jays – 3 yrs, $10 mil + option
61. Kyle Farnsworth (RHP Rays):
**. Tom Gorzelanny (LHP Nationals): Brewers – 2 yrs, $6 mil
62. Erik Bedard (LHP free agent):
63. David Ross (C Braves): Red Sox – 2 yrs, $6.2 mil
64. Jon Rauch (RHP Mets):
65. Scott Hairston (OF Mets):
66. Jason Grilli (RHP Pirates): Pirates – 2 yrs, $6.75 mil
67. Jonny Gomes (OF Athletics): Red Sox – 2 yrs, $10 mil
68. Kevin Correia (RHP Pirates): Twins – 2 yrs, $10 mil
**. Mike Pelfrey (RHP Mets): Twins – 1 yr, $4 mil + incentives
69. Eric Chavez (3B Yankees): Diamondbacks – 1 yr, $3 mil
70. Raul Ibanez (OF-DH Yankees): Mariners – 1 yr, $2.75 mil
71. Roberto Hernandez (RHP Indians): Rays – 1 yr, $3.25 mil + incentives
72. Luke Scott (OF-DH Rays):
73. Vicente Padilla (RHP Red Sox): Signed $3.25 million to play in Japan
74. Scott Rolen (3B Reds):
**. Jeff Karstens (RHP Pirates): Pirates – 1 yr, $2.5 mil
75. Carlos Zambrano (RHP Marlins):
76. Carlos Lee (1B Marlins):
77. Francisco Rodriguez (RHP Brewers):
78. Placido Polanco (3B Phillies): Marlins – 1 yr, $2.75 mil
79. Jose Veras (RHP Brewers): Astros – 1 yr, $2 mil + option
80. Grady Sizemore (OF Indians):
81. Scott Feldman (RHP Rangers): Cubs – 1 yr, $6 mil
82. Alex Gonzalez (SS Brewers):
**. Jair Jurrjens (RHP Braves):
83. Matt Capps (RHP Twins):
**. Geovany Soto (C Rangers): Rangers – 1 yr, $2.75 mil
**. Nate Schierholtz (OF Phillies): Cubs – 1 yr, $2.25 mil
84. Daisuke Matsuzaka (RHP Red Sox):
85. Carlos Pena (1B Rays): Astros – 1 yr, $2.9 mil + incentives
86. Jason Marquis (RHP Padres): Padres – 1 yr, $3 mil
87. Jason Frasor (RHP Blue Jays): Rangers – 1 yr, $1.5 mil
**: Manny Parra (LHP Brewers):
88. Derek Lowe (RHP Yankees):
89. Chris Young (RHP Mets):
90. Andruw Jones (OF Yankees): Signed $3.6 million deal to play in Japan
91. Michael Gonzalez (LHP Nationals): Brewers – 1 yr, $2.25 mil + incentives
92. Miguel Olivo (C Mariners):
**. Manny Acosta (RHP Mets): Signed $1.65 million deal to play in Japan
93. Jason Bartlett (SS free agent):
94. Kevin Millwood (RHP Mariners):
95. Jim Thome (DH Orioles):
96. Rod Barajas (C Pirates):
97. James Loney (1B Red Sox): Rays – 1 yr, $2 mil
98. Jeff Francis (LHP Rockies): Rockies – 1 yr, $1.5 mil + $1.5 mil in incentives
99. Kelly Shoppach (C Mets):
**. Jesus Flores (C Nationals): Dodgers – minor league contract
**. Andres Torres (OF Mets): Giants – 1 yr, $2 mil
**. Ryan Sweeney (OF Red Sox):
100. Mark Lowe (RHP Rangers):
101. Brandon Inge (3B Athletics):
102. Jonathan Sanchez (LHP Rockies):
103. Ty Wigginton (INF-OF Phillies): Cardinals – 2 yrs, $5 mil
104. Takashi Toritani (SS Japan): Remaining in Japan with Hanshin
105. Chien-Ming Wang (RHP Nationals):
***. Ian Stewart (3B Cubs): Cubs – 1 yr, $2 mil
106. Travis Hafner (DH Indians):
107. Ramon Ramirez (RHP Mets):
108. Carl Pavano (RHP Twins):
109. Reed Johnson (OF Braves): Braves – 1 yr, $1.75 mil + option
110. Hideki Okajima (LHP Japan):
111. Juan Rivera (OF Dodgers):

Signed pre-rankings:

Jake Peavy (RHP White Sox): White Sox – 2 yrs, $29 mil + vesting option
Brandon League (RHP Dodgers): Dodgers – 3 yrs, $22.5 mil + option
Chris Iannetta (C Angels): Angels – 3 yrs, $15.55 mil
Joel Peralta (RHP Rays): Rays – 2 yrs, $6 mil + options
Bartolo Colon (RHP Athletics): Athletics – 1 yr, $3 mil
Oliver Perez (LHP Mariners): Mariners – 1 yr, $1.5 mil

Other deals:

Randy Choate (LHP Dodgers): Cardinals – 3 yrs, $7.5 mil
Jack Hannahan (3B Indians): Reds – 2 yrs, $4 mil
Gerald Laird (C Tigers): Braves – 2 yrs, $3.3 mil
Nate McLouth (OF Orioles): Orioles – 1 yr, $2 mil
Dioner Navarro (C Reds): Cubs – 1 yr, $1.75 mil
Casey McGehee (3B Yankees): Signed $1.5 mil deal to play in Japan
Shawn Camp (RHP Cubs): Cubs – 1 yr, $1.35 mil
Eric Hinske (1B-OF Braves): Diamondbacks – 1 yr, $1.075 mil
Jason Bay (OF Mets): Mariners – 1 yr – $1 mil
Zach Duke (LHP Nationals): Nationals – 1 yr

Jackie Robinson: “I cannot stand and sing the anthem. I cannot salute the flag”

FILE - In this April 11, 1947 file photo, Jackie Robinson of the Brooklyn Dodgers poses at Ebbets Field in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Robinson's widow said Major League Baseball has yet to fully honor her husband's legacy. "There is a lot more that needs to be done and that can be done in terms of the hiring, the promotion" of minorities in the sport, Rachel Robinson said Monday, Jan. 18, 2016 during a Q&A session with TV critics about "Jackie Robinson," a two-part PBS documentary airing in April.  (AP Photo/John Rooney, File)
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One more bit of baseball via which we may reflect on the Colin Kaepernick controversy.

In 1972 Jackie Robinson wrote his autobiography. In it he reflected on how he felt about his historical legacy as a baseball player, a businessman and as a political activist. A political activism, it should be noted, which favored both sides of the aisle at various times. He supported Nixon in 1960, supported the war in Vietnam and worked for Nelson Rockefeller. He did not support Goldwater and did support the 1964 Civil Rights Act. He supported Humphrey against Nixon in 1968. He was no blind partisan or ideologue. When you find someone like that you can usually rest assured it’s because they’re thinking hard and thinking critically in a world where things aren’t always cut-and-dried.

As such, this statement from his autobiography, describing his memory of the first game of the 1947 World Series, is worth thinking about. Because it came from someone who spent a lot of time thinking:

There I was, the black grandson of a slave, the son of a black sharecropper, part of a historic occasion, a symbolic hero to my people. The air was sparkling. The sunlight was warm. The band struck up the national anthem. The flag billowed in the wind. It should have been a glorious moment for me as the stirring words of the national anthem poured from the stands. Perhaps, it was, but then again, perhaps, the anthem could be called the theme song for a drama called The Noble Experiment. Today, as I look back on that opening game of my first world series, I must tell you that it was Mr. Rickey’s drama and that I was only a principal actor. As I write this twenty years later, I cannot stand and sing the anthem. I cannot salute the flag; I know that I am a black man in a white world. In 1972, in 1947, at my birth in 1919, I know that I never had it made.

Colin Kaepernick is not Jackie Robinson and America in 2016 is not the same as America in 1919, 1947 or 1972. But it does not take one of Jackie Robinson’s stature or experience to see and take issue with injustice and inequality which manifestly still exists.

As I said in the earlier post, the First Amendment gives us just as much right to criticize Kaepernick as it gives him a right to protest in the manner in which he chooses. But if and when we do, we should not consider his case in a vacuum or criticize him as some singular or radical actor. Because some other people — people who have been elevated to a level which has largely immunized them from criticism — felt and feel the same way he does. It’s worth asking yourself, if you take issue, whether you take issue with the message or the messenger and why. Such inquiries might complicate one’s feelings on the matter, but they’re quite illuminative as well.

(thanks to Kokujin for the heads up)

Former Dodgers owner Frank McCourt is a sports owner once again

File photo of Frank McCourt leaving Stanley Mosk Courthouse after testifying during his divorce trial in Los Angeles
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There aren’t many major league ownership reigns which ended more ignominiously than Frank McCourt’s reign as Dodgers owner. He was granted access to one of business’ most exclusive clubs — one which being a convicted criminal or even a Nazi sympathizer cannot get you kicked out of — and somehow got kicked out. The clear lesson from his saga was that saddling your team with debt, using it as your own private piggy bank and exercising bad judgment at every possible turn will not get you drummed out of baseball but, by gum, having it all go public in a divorce case sure as heck will.

McCourt landed pretty safely, though. By sheer luck, his being kicked out of ownership coincided with the vast appreciation of major league franchise values and the expiration of the Dodgers cable television deal. He may have left in disgrace, but he also left with a couple of billion dollars thanks to the genius of capitalism. At the time it was assumed he’d ride off into the sunset, continuing to make a mint off of parking at Dodgers games (he retained a big piece of that pie) and not get his hands messy with sports ownership again.

Such assumptions were inoperative:

The soccer club has suffered from poor financial decisions in recent years. So I guess it was a match made in heaven.