Ken Davidoff answers his critics in the wake of his R.A. Dickey column

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Over the weekend, Ken Davidoff of the New York Post wrote a column in which he criticized departing New York Mets pitcher R.A. Dickey, calling him a “handful,” saying he was not well-liked by his teammates and generally painting a picture of a self-absorbed self promoter.

It was surprising for a couple of reasons. First, because no one had ever described Dickey in such terms and the timing suggested that perhaps the Mets were throwing him under the bus as he left the team. But it was more surprising coming from Davidoff, who is one of the best, most reasonable and most level-headed columnists around, particularly in New York. He just doesn’t write that kind of stuff very often, so it was kind of jarring to see.

Today, much to Davidoff’s credit, he writes another column, this one explaining the basis for his criticism of Dickey in his last one. The questions he asks and then answers such as “Why are we just hearing now about these aspects of Dickey’s personality?” and “Aren’t you just being a water-carrier for the Mets front office” echo ones we saw bouncing around the internet over the weekend. And Davidoff takes them head on.

You may still question Davidoff’s column and disagree with what he had to say about R.A. Dickey, but kudos to Davidoff to actually engaging his readers and critics like this.  Would that more writers did the same.

Enrique Hernandez’s performance one for the record books

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Entering Thursday’s NLCS Game 5, Dodgers outfielder Enrique Hernandez had never hit a home run nor even driven in a run in the playoffs in his four-year career. He had homered twice in a regular season game just twice and his career-high for RBI in a game was four.

Hernandez hit three home runs and knocked in seven runs to help power the Dodgers past the Cubs 11-1 to win the National League pennant and punch their ticket to the World Series. His first homer was a solo homer to center field in the second inning off of starter Jose Quintana. He blasted a grand slam to right field off of Hector Rondon in the fourth, then tacked on a two-run blast in the ninth inning off of Mike Montgomery to make it 11-1.

Hernandez is the 10th player to hit three home runs in a postseason game. Jose Altuve, of course, did it two weeks ago in Game 1 of the ALDS against the Red Sox. Before Altuve, Pablo Sandoval (2012), Albert Pujols (2011), and Adrian Beltre (2011) were the last players to accomplish the feat.

Hernandez’s seven RBI set a new National League record for a postseason game. Only four other players — Troy O’Leary, John Valentin, Mo Vaughn, and Edgar Martinez — accomplished the feat.

No one has hit three home runs and knocked in seven-plus in a game… until Hernandez. He certainly picked a good time to break out.