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Pirates GM Neal Huntington defends SEALs training


The Pirates have taken guff from various corners of the baseball universe — and from some of their own players — for requiring exhausting Navy SEALs-style training methods at the minor league level.

And now they’re also getting criticism from fans.

Bob Cohn, a staff writer for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, describes the scene from Saturday afternoon’s open fan Q&A at PirateFest:

The Pirates‘ controversial Navy SEALs training program for its minor-league players escaped mention during season-ticket holders‘ questions to team management Friday at PirateFest. But then there was Saturday‘s Q&A at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center open to the so-called “general fans.”

One of them, Matthew Wein, 30, of Pittsburgh, raised the point while challenging the qualifications and expertise of assistant general manager Kyle Stark and director of player development Larry Broadway. Among his questions and comments, Wein cited “the techniques these guys are using in the minors, the militaristic garbage to train baseball players.”

Pirates general manager Neal Huntington immediately went on the defensive, responding bluntly to Wein that the organization is committed to “the best physical, best mental, best personal development we can get” and that “if borrowing from the elite of the elites is a bad thing, I‘m puzzled by that.”

“Collegiate and Olympic teams have gained valuable insight, gained valuable experience from the Navy SEALs,” continued Huntington. “We‘re not alone in our belief that these techniques work. As a matter of fact, these are the scientifically proven techniques that help young men grow, that help young men develop.”

Pirates owner Bob Nutting said last month that the training — which included late-night scavenger hunts and a “Hell Week” — would be discontinued. But it doesn’t sound like the team’s higher-ups necessarily want it to.

Bud Black rejoins the Angels in a front office role

Bud Black
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The Angels have hired Bud Black as a special assistant to the general manager.

Black is returning to the Angels, actually, as he spent seven seasons as the Angels pitching coach under Mike Scioscia prior to leaving to take over the Padres in 2007. He held that job until this past June and takes this one after a weird, brief and ultimately aborted flirtation with the Washington Nationals.

You’ll recall that Jerry Dipoto was forced out of Anaheim after losing a power struggle with Scioscia. Now, with one of Scioscia’s former lieutenants on the staff of new general manager Billy Eppler, there should be no doubt about how really has the power when it comes to the Angels.

MLB in negotiations to play a game in London

British Flag

Baseball was not invented by some American in upstate New York. Rather, it evolved from a number of different bat-and-ball games like cricket, roundersbat and trap, and stool ball. These games, first played in England, meshed together over time in important ways to form what we now know of as baseball.  It’s a fascinating history, featured in a great documentary which searches for baseball’s primordial common ancestor.

Which is to say that, while this seems odd given baseball’s almost total lack of popularity in the U.K., it’s not entirely inappropriate. It’s really just an overdue homecoming:

The operators of the Olympic Stadium were on Saturday night in advanced negotiations to stage the first ever Major League Baseball game in Europe.

Telegraph Sport has learnt that serious talks have taken place over bringing a series of MLB matches to the London 2012 centrepiece, potentially as early as 2017.

MLB officials have long been exploring hosting regular-season games in Europe, declaring an interest in the Olympic Stadium as long ago as March 2012.

“Matches.” OMG the British are so cute.

All we Yanks ask is that our British cousins play evening games so we can watch them at a decent hour. Thanks.

(h/t CBS Eye on Baseball)

Jose Reyes pleads not guilty to spousal abuse in Hawaii

Colorado Rockies' Jose Reyes follows through on a base hit against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the first inning of a baseball game, Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Rockies shortstop Jose Reyes pleaded not guilty yesterday to abusing his wife in Hawaii on October 31.

Reyes was arrested at the time and was released after posting $1,000 bail. He was not in Hawaii for the arraignment and his not guilty plea was entered on his behalf by his attorney.

Which means that he’s probably in his usual offseason home on Long Island. Which, I am told, is a short drive from Major League Baseball headquarters. Which makes one wonder if Reyes has yet to be interviewed by Rob Manfred in anticipation of the punishment he will no doubt receive under Major League Baseball’s domestic violence policy. A policy which specifically says that the Commissioner need not wait for the justice system to play out before assessing his own discipline.

So, Rob. How you doin’ man?


Giants interested in John Lackey

John Lackey
AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast

Ben Cafardo of the Boston Globe speculated on Sunday that there might be a connection between the Giants and veteran free agent right-hander John Lackey, and now FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal reports that San Francisco is indeed in pursuit.

Rosenthal says the Giants, “like most clubs seeking pitching, [are] examining [a] wide range of options” in this starter-heavy free agent market. Lackey would make a ton of sense for any contender on something like a two-year deal. His free agency is tied to draft pick compensation, but that shouldn’t be much of a deterrent.

The 37-year-old right-hander registered a career-best 2.77 ERA across 218 innings (33 starts) this past season for the National League Central-champion Cardinals and he was St. Louis’ most reliable starter during the playoffs.

It’s well known that he wants to remain in the National League.