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Please stop making “Josh Hamilton in L.A.” drug wisecracks

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The minute the Angels interest in Josh Hamilton was reported, people on Twitter and in the comments started in with stuff about how it’s bad for a drug addict/alcoholic to play in Los Angeles. This kind of thing:

This is a nonsense concern for a few reasons. Among them:

1. The Angels play in Anaheim, not some crash pad in the inner city or some burnout rock star’s home in Laurel Canyon. Disneyland is there for cryin’ out loud, and Hamilton will almost certainly live in some gated beach compound. He’s not exactly being dropped into a den of sin, here.

2. He played in Dallas for the past few years and Dallas, you may be shocked to hear, is a huge city with a lot of drugs and booze and things too;

3. His substance abuse trouble started back home in North Carolina and increased while he played in the Sally League and places like it. It’s not like he needed the bright lights and big city to tempt him.

4. As any addict can tell you — and as common sense instructs — you can get drugs or booze anyplace. Absolutely anyplace, from the biggest city to the smallest town in America. It’s not hard. The battle is not distancing yourself from them in a geographic sense. It’s about keeping them out of your personal space, both physically and mentally. Hamilton will battle addiction in L.A. like he did in Dallas and Cincinnati and Florida before that. He could be traded to Mars and he’ll have to fight it.

So yes, like Zack Greinke’s anxiety disorder we discussed this morning, Josh Hamilton in L.A. is an easy punchline or, at best, low-hanging analytical fruit. But it’s also pretty frickin’ beside the point, so just let it go, OK?

Hisashi Iwakuma’s 2017 option vests, but salary still undetermined

OAKLAND, CA - AUGUST 13: Hisashi Iwakuma #18 of the Seattle Mariners pitches against the Oakland Athletics in the bottom of the third inning at the Oakland Coliseum on August 13, 2016 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
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With last Wednesday’s start against the Yankees, Mariners hurler Hisashi Iwakuma pushed his 2016 innings total up to 2016. That clears the 162-inning hurdle for his 2017 option to vest at $14 million. However, as Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors reports, the language in Iwakuma’s contract also stipulates that the right-hander finish the season without suffering a specific injury.

Iwakuma, 35, was in agreement with the Dodgers on a three-year contract back in December but failed the physical, which nullified the deal. He ended up signing with the Mariners on a one-year, $12 million deal with a full no-trade clause and club options for 2017 and ’18 that vest at specific inning thresholds (162 each or 324 for both seasons).

This season, Iwakuma has stayed healthy, making 26 starts to the tune of a 14-9 record, a 3.81 ERA and a 118/36 K/BB ratio in 163 innings.

Ichiro Suzuki passes Wade Boggs for 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 28: Ichiro Suzuki #51 of the Miami Marlins grounds out during the 2nd inning against the San Diego Padres at Marlins Park on August 28, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
Eric Espada/Getty Images
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Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki deposited a single to left-center field in the fourth inning of Monday night’s game against the Mets, then added a double to center field in the eighth. Those mark hits No. 3,010 and 3,011 for Suzuki in his major league career, tying and then moving past Wade Boggs for sole possession of 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list.

Suzuki would come around to score on a double by Xavier Scruggs to break a scoreless tie in the eighth.

Here’s the video of Ichiro’s first hit.

By the end of the season, Suzuki will have presumably moved ahead of Rafael Palmeiro (26th; 3,020) and Lou Brock (25th; 3,023).

Suzuki was 2-for-4 after the double. With baseball’s fifth month nearly complete, the 42-year-old is currently batting .298/.371/.373.