Great Moments in Hall of Fame Voting


Pat Hickey from the Montreal Gazette goes over his Hall of Fame ballot. He notes that voting is a difficult and involved undertaking, and says “If you’re doing it right, it should take three to four hours to fill out a ballot for the Baseball Hall of Fame.”

Then, after noting that he’s not voting for the PED guys on character grounds, he says this:

Pete Rose was ignored by a majority of voters for the 15 years he was on the ballot …

Pete Rose has never appeared on a Hall of Fame ballot as he is banned from baseball and is thus ineligible pursuant to the Hall of Fame’s rules. Which inspires one to ask what the hell Hickey is doing in those 3-4 hours he studies his ballot.

Hickey goes on to say that “The black mark against [Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens] is their arrogance in denying any wrongdoing.”  This comes a couple sentences after he notes that Mark McGwire garnered only 19.5% of the vote in his sixth year of eligibility. Given McGwire’s lack of denials — indeed, the complete opposite of denials — something tells me that the black mark changes depending on the candidate.

This is not unique. Expect to see a plethora of incoherent things like this from Hall of Fame voters in the coming weeks.


Henderson Alvarez signs with Tigres de Quintana Roo

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Free agent right-hander Henderson Alvarez signed a deal with the Tigres de Quintana Roo of the Mexican Baseball League earlier this week, FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman reported Friday. The righty wasn’t necessarily too fringey a player to hack it in the big leagues, but there were no MLB takers in attendance during his showcase in Venezuela last month and he clearly felt it best to try his luck elsewhere.

The 27-year-old’s last major league gig came with the Phillies, for whom he delivered a 4.30 ERA, 6.8 BB/9 and 3.7 SO/9 over 14 2/3 innings in 2017. While he’s not too far removed from his first and only All-Star bid in 2014, he was besieged by shoulder issues in 2015 and 2016 and underwent season-ending surgeries as a result.

That added injury risk, coupled with the fact that he hasn’t pitched more than 22 innings in a single season since 2014, may have been too much for major league teams to take on this spring. Assuming he steers clear of further injuries, however, a return to the majors may not be entirely out of the question in years to come.