Indians, Reds and Diamondbacks talking three-team trade

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Danny Knobler of CBS Sports reported earlier that the Reds were trying to acquire outfielder Shin-Soo Choo from the Indians, with Drew Stubbs and infield prospect Didi Gregorius heading to Cleveland in return. But that deal has since grown a bit larger.

According to FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal, on the table now is a three-team blockbuster that would send Choo to Cincinnati along with infielder Jason Donald, Stubbs and a young Diamondbacks starting pitcher to the Indians, and Gregorius to the Snakes.

Patrick Corbin, Trevor Bauer and Tyler Skaggs are the Arizona pitchers that are currently being discussed. Rosenthal thinks the D’Backs are least likely to want to move Skaggs and Bauer is a pretty highly-rated prospect, so we’d guess it’s going to be Corbin.

It’s not a sure thing that there will be a resolution to these discussions before the end of the night.

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UPDATE, 8:11 PM: Jack Magruder of FOX Sports Arizona says the Diamondbacks will get more than just Gregorius and Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain-Dealer hears that nine total players could be involved.

UPDATE, 8:52 PM: CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman reports that the part of the trade sending Choo and Donald to the Reds has been agreed upon, but also that there’s “a lot more” coming. So stay tuned.

UPDATE, 9:02 PM: According to MLB.com beat writer Steve Gilbert, the Diamondbacks and Indians have not yet finalized their end of the three-team swap. But the expectation is that they will soon.

UPDATE, 9:07 PM: Rosenthal reports that pitchers Bryan Shaw and Matt Albers will go from Arizona to Cleveland. Asdrubal Cabrera could wind up with the Diamondbacks. Gregorius seems headed to the Tribe.

UPDATE, 9:10 PM: The Indians are getting Bauer from the Diamondbacks, according to ESPN’s Buster Olney. We’ll put up a fresh post when all the names and destinations are revealed.

UPDATE, 9:13 PM: Rosenthal now clarifies that Cabrera is not involved. Gregorius will go to Arizona.

UPDATE, 9:15 PM: Gilbert says the Diamondbacks are getting left-hander Tony Sipp and outfielder Lars Anderson from the Indians. Lots of moving parts here, folks. We’ll try to clarify it all soon.

UPDATE, 9:26 PM: All sides have agreed to the three-team, nine-player trade. Head HERE for more.

Must-Click Link: Sherri Nichols, Sabermetic Pioneer

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If you are old enough and lame enough as I am, you may have lurked around on sabermetic message boards in the 1990s. If you did, you may have heard of Sherri Nichols, who back in the day, was a significant contributor to the advancement of statistical analysis, particularly defensive analysis.

While it’s probably better that not everyone is as old and nerdy as me, the downside of it is that most people haven’t heard of Nichols and know nothing about her contributions. That changes today with Ben Lindbergh’s excellent analysis of Nichols and her work over at The Ringer, which I recommend that you all read.

The short version: Nichols is the one who planted the seed about on-base percentage being valuable in the mind of Baseball Prospectus Founder Gary Huckabay, back in the late 80s. She’s also the one most responsible for the rise of zone-based defensive metrics in the 1990s, such as Defensive Average, which she created and which served as the basis for other such metrics going forward. She also played a critical role in the development of RetroSheet, which collected almost all extant box score and play-by-play information going back to the turn of the 20th century, thereby making so much of the information available at Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs possible. A key contribution there: making the information free and available to everyone, rather than closing the underlying data off as proprietary and either charging for access or keeping it in-house like some recent data collectors have chosen to do. Ahem.

A larger takeaway than all of Nichols’ contributions is just how loathe the baseball community was to listen to a woman back then. I mean, yeah, they’re still loathe to listen to women now, as indicated by the small number of women who hold jobs in baseball operations departments, but back then it was even worse, as evidenced by Lindbergh’s stories and Nichols’ anecdotes.

A great read and a great history lesson.