Now that Zack Greinke is in the fold, the Dodgers could try to lock up Clayton Kershaw

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It’s possible that Zack Greinke’s six-year, $147 million deal won’t be the biggest contract the deep-pocketed Dodgers give out this offseason.

According to Dylan Hernandez of the Los Angeles Times, Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti said during the press conference for left-hander Hyun-Jin Ryu earlier today that it’s possible the club could explore extension talks with staff ace Clayton Kershaw in the coming weeks. This actually isn’t much different than what Colletti said just about a month ago, but he wanted to put the issue on the backburner while he dealt with more pressing matters. He might be ready now, though.

Kershaw is owed $11 million in 2013 in the second year of a two-year, $19 million contract and is arbitration-eligible for the final time next offseason. Greinke’s deal will likely function as a benchmark in talks and it would be a surprise if he didn’t surpass CC Sabathia’s record $161 commitment from the Yankees. Heck, he could be the game’s first $200 million pitcher.

Kershaw, 24, has a 2.79 ERA over his first five seasons in the big leagues. After winning the NL Cy Young award in 2011, he was the runner-up to R.A. Dickey this past season.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.