Boston Red Sox

Pedro Martinez: “I did it clean and my integrity is right where it belongs”


Pedro Martinez was in attendance for David Ortiz’s celebrity golf fundraiser in the Dominican Republic yesterday and he had some interesting things to say about the steroids era and his own legacy.

What Martinez did during his career was impressive enough without context, but many have wondered what his numbers would have looked like if everyone was on an even playing field. Martinez wonders the same thing, but told Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe that he has no regrets.

“I never had a complaint. I don’t have it. I think I did it the best way possible,” he said on Friday. “What would have happened if I had a level playing field? It’s something to be guessed. This is the same body that you saw, except for a couple of more pounds.”

With a hotly-contested Hall of Fame vote just weeks away, Martinez offered no firm opinion on the candidacies of Roger Clemens or Barry Bonds, but noted that they had impressive statistics before “everything exploded.”

“It’s really difficult for me to choose either one. I would have loved to face Roger Clemens when he was Roger Clemens with nothing. I would have loved to face him all the time.

There has never been any evidence to suggest that Martinez used performance-enhancing drugs during his playing career, so he should be a no-brainer, first-ballot Hall of Famer when he’s first eligible two years from now. But he still made it a point to say that he was clean and played the game the right way.

“I was clean. I know I was clean. That’s all I can say. I was out there and they got the best out of me. Beat me or not, that was the best I had, and clean. I wish it were the same way for every one of them.”

“In my last years with the Mets, I was pushed too far. I was going too far with the pain. I did it naturally, I rehabbed naturally. I went through struggles a lot naturally. Today I can actually sit back, relax and enjoy the flight because I did it clean and my integrity is right where it belongs.”

I don’t mean to single out Martinez here and I’d like to think that he was clean since he was one of my favorite players ever, but it would have been nice to see some of these guys speak out while they were still playing. Perhaps we’d have less irresponsible guesswork being done by columnists who have these player’s legacies in their hands.

Red Sox ask Hanley Ramirez to report 15-20 pounds lighter next spring

Hanley Ramirez
The Associated Press
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Hanley Ramirez was a complete failure in left field this season in Boston and he batted just .249/.291/.426 while appearing in only 105 games. Ben Cherington, the man that signed him to a four-year, $88 million free agent contract, is no longer with the Red Sox. It’s time for some tough love …

Red Sox interim manager Torey Lovullo, who just inked a two-year extension to return as John Farrell’s bench coach, told Scott Lauber of the Boston Herald on Sunday that Hanley has been asked to drop 15-20 pounds over the offseason. There have been similar conversations with Boston’s other free agent failure, Pablo Sandoval.

Ramirez is expected to start at first base for the Red Sox in 2016.

Video: Clayton Kershaw notches his 300th strikeout

Clayton Kershaw
AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill
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Clayton Kershaw entered Sunday’s regular-season finale against the Padres needing six strikeouts to become the first pitcher in 13 years to whiff 300 batters in a single season.

He did it within the first nine batters of the game, whiffing Yangervis Solarte, Clint Barmes, Austin Hedges, and Travis Jankowski once each and Melvin Upton Jr. on two different occasions.

Here was the milestone matchup against Upton Jr. with two outs in the top of the third …

The last pitchers to reach 300 strikeouts in a season were Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling. They did so as teammates on the 2002 Diamondbacks.

Kershaw is lined up to face the Mets in Game 1 of the NLDS.