Pedro Martinez: “I did it clean and my integrity is right where it belongs”

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Pedro Martinez was in attendance for David Ortiz’s celebrity golf fundraiser in the Dominican Republic yesterday and he had some interesting things to say about the steroids era and his own legacy.

What Martinez did during his career was impressive enough without context, but many have wondered what his numbers would have looked like if everyone was on an even playing field. Martinez wonders the same thing, but told Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe that he has no regrets.

“I never had a complaint. I don’t have it. I think I did it the best way possible,” he said on Friday. “What would have happened if I had a level playing field? It’s something to be guessed. This is the same body that you saw, except for a couple of more pounds.”

With a hotly-contested Hall of Fame vote just weeks away, Martinez offered no firm opinion on the candidacies of Roger Clemens or Barry Bonds, but noted that they had impressive statistics before “everything exploded.”

“It’s really difficult for me to choose either one. I would have loved to face Roger Clemens when he was Roger Clemens with nothing. I would have loved to face him all the time.

There has never been any evidence to suggest that Martinez used performance-enhancing drugs during his playing career, so he should be a no-brainer, first-ballot Hall of Famer when he’s first eligible two years from now. But he still made it a point to say that he was clean and played the game the right way.

“I was clean. I know I was clean. That’s all I can say. I was out there and they got the best out of me. Beat me or not, that was the best I had, and clean. I wish it were the same way for every one of them.”

“In my last years with the Mets, I was pushed too far. I was going too far with the pain. I did it naturally, I rehabbed naturally. I went through struggles a lot naturally. Today I can actually sit back, relax and enjoy the flight because I did it clean and my integrity is right where it belongs.”

I don’t mean to single out Martinez here and I’d like to think that he was clean since he was one of my favorite players ever, but it would have been nice to see some of these guys speak out while they were still playing. Perhaps we’d have less irresponsible guesswork being done by columnists who have these player’s legacies in their hands.

The Mets will not commit to Matt Harvey making his next start

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Matt Harvey has had a bad and injury-filled couple of years. He hit spring training in decent physical shape, however, and there was much talk about a possible Harvey Renaissance. At times in February, March and in his first start in early April he looked alright too.

That has changed, however. Over his last three starts he has allowed 14 runs on 25 hits in 16 innings, with his latest stinker being last night’s six runs on eight hits outing against the Braves. The poor pitching has resulted in Mets manager Mickey Calloway not committing to Harvey taking his next turn in the rotation. Or, as Ken Davidoff reports in the Post, not commenting when asked if Harvey would, indeed, make his next start.

It’s bad enough when the manager will not make such a commitment, but the Mets pitching coach, Dave Eiland, made comments after the game suggesting the possibility of the Mets putting Harvey in the bullpen. The comments were not pointed, but this suggests his thinking, I’d assume:

While neither Callaway nor Eiland would tip his hand about Harvey’s immediate future, Eiland, who most recently worked for the Royals, smiled when a reporter asked him if he had ever switched a starter to the bullpen under duress. “Yeah, a guy by the name of Wade Davis,” he said. “It turned out pretty well for him.”

That’s a generous way of putting it and, for Harvey, such comments could soften the blow to his ego if, indeed, the club decides to move him to the bullpen. It’s not a demotion, he could claim, it’s the team giving him a chance to regain his past stardom in a different role!

However, whether it was because he was stinging from a poor performance or because he simply hates the idea, Harvey seemed to reject the possibility out of hand, saying, “I’m a starting pitcher. I’ve always been a starting pitcher. That’s my mindset.”

Looks like he’s either going to have to change his mindset or else he’s not going to have a place to pitch in New York for very much longer.