Negotiations between the Dodgers and Ryu Hyun-Jin are expected to go down to the wire

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The Dodgers bid $25.7 million last month for exclusive negotiating rights on South Korean left-hander Ryu Hyun-Jin. Now they have a little more than 24 hours to get a deal done.

Jim Bowden of ESPN.com and MLB Network Radio on Sirius XM was told by a Dodgers source that they expect negotiations will go right up until the 5 p.m. deadline tomorrow. Of course, that’s not really unusual for a situation like this, so that doesn’t mean that a deal is in jeopardy.

The last we heard on Tuesday, Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti said that his offer to Hyun-Jin fell “a tad short.” Hyun-Jin’s agent, Scott Boras, then acknowledged that he had made a counter-offer and that negotiations were ongoing.

Hyun-Jin turns 26 in March and owns a 2.80 ERA over seven seasons in the Korean Baseball Organization. Per Bill Plunkett of the Orange County Register, Boras said earlier this week that the southpaw is ready to step in as a No. 3 starter immediately and needs to be paid “within the standards of what other No. 3’s are getting.” It’s fair to guess that may put him in the range of Jeremy Guthrie’s recent three-year, $25 million deal with the Royals.

If a deal isn’t worked out, Hyun-Jin will return to his team in the KBO while the Dodgers will not be responsible for the posting fee.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: