Scott Boras still trying to entice Tigers on Rafael Soriano

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With no teams showing much interest in paying $10 million per year and giving up a draft pick for a closer, agent Scott Boras is hoping the Tigers have a change of heart and bid for Rafael Soriano.

MLB.com’s Jason Beck has the quotes:

“I think the Tigers’ position is one where they’re trying to put together their best team and they haven’t made those decisions yet,” Boras said.

Even before being specifically asked about the Tigers, Boras tried to shoot down the concept of a contender going with a rookie in the closer’s role, as the Tigers are thinking of doing with Bruce Rondon.

“The evidence says that there are many young players in our game that are 20, 21 that can hit 30 home runs and drive in 100 runs and they’re extraordinary talents. Or win 15 games. But there’s never been closers that can come in and get 30 saves,” Boras said. “I think you count on one hand the number of closers under the age of 23 that have ever gone to the big leagues and at a young age put together 30 saves, let alone pitch in the postseason and be effective.”

Of course, Boras rarely shoots his mouth off without already having looked up the facts ahead of time. Just two pitchers under the age of 23 have ever saved 30 games in the majors: Huston Street (37 in 2006) and Neftali Feliz (40 in 2010). Seven more have saved 30 games at age 23 (not including Feliz a second time).

That said, I’d certainly put forth the argument that the reason there are so few 30-save relievers that young is because teams are so conservative about keeping veterans in the closer’s role. Whether a young player hits 30 homers is something that player controls. Saves are a manufactured stat, and there are no shortage of 22- and 23-year-old relievers that have been good enough to save 30 games.

Yasmany Tomas arrested for reckless driving and criminal speeding

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KTAR News is reporting that Diamondbacks outfielder Yasmany Tomas was arrested on Thursday morning for driving faster than 100 MPH, according to the Arizona Department of Public Safety. He was charged with reckless driving and criminal speeding.

The maximum sentence for a criminal speeding charge is up to 30 days in jail and a fine up to $500. It is considered a Class 3 misdemeanor. Tomas may also have his license suspended.

A Diamondbacks spokesperson said, “We are very disappointed to learn of this news. We are still gathering facts, and will refrain from further comment at this time as this is a pending legal matter.”

Tomas, 27, signed a six-year, $68.5 million contract with the Diamondbacks in December 2014 as an amateur free agent out of Cuba. He has mostly disappointed, owning a .769 OPS while playing subpar defense in the outfield as well as at third base, where the club briefly tried him. He battled a groin injury for most of the past season and ultimately underwent core muscle surgery in August.