Ryan Dempster turns down $26 million offer from Royals, Cubs not involved in bidding

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10:13 p.m. EST update: According to Gordon Wittenmyer of the Chicago Sun-Times, negotiations between the Cubs and Ryan Dempster are “not happening” and a reunion is “implausible.”

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9:10 p.m. EST update: ESPNChicago.com’s Bruce Levine says the Cubs and Dempster are discussing the parameters of a deal. Dempster spent 8 1/2 seasons with the Cubs before being traded to the Rangers in July.

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Holding out for a three-year contract, Ryan Dempster turned down a two-year, $26 million deal from the Royals, according to the Kansas City Star’s Bob Dutton.

Dempster asked the Royals to go to three years, but that appears to be a deal breaker for Kansas City.

Besides Kansas City, Boston and Milwaukee appear to be the prime suitors for Dempster. The Red Sox have already handed out a pair of three-year, $39 million contracts to Mike Napoli and Shane Victorino, so what’s one more?

The Angels were also interested in Dempster, but they’ve backed away now, says CBSSports.com’s Jon Heyman.

Dempster went 5-5 with a 2.25 ERA in 16 starts for the Cubs and 7-3 with a 5.09 ERA in 12 starts for the Rangers last season. While the latter mark doesn’t speak well of his ability to pitch in the AL, he did have a 70/25 K/BB ratio in 69 innings with Texas.

Former number one pick Mark Appel DFA’d by the Phillies

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Life comes at you fast.

The Phillies have designated pitcher Mark Appel for assignment. Appel was the number one overall pick, taken by the Houston Astros, in the 2013 draft before being dealt to the Phillies in 2015. He was selected one slot ahead of Kris Bryant and 31 slots above Aaron Judge, by the way.

Appel, who is somehow already 26, posted a 5.27 ERA and 60/53 K/BB ratio over 82 Triple-A innings in 2017. He’s had a history of bone spurs and other ailments that have hindered his development.

It could still come together for Appel in a new location — the Phillies have seven days to trade or waive him — but at this point you can’t consider him a prospect.