Mariners add Jason Bay on one-year deal

16 Comments

This is what’s known in the business as taking a flier.

According to Andy Martino of the New York Daily News, the Mariners have added Jason Bay on a one-year contract after he hit .165/.237/.299 in 194 at-bats last season and then accepted a buyout from the Mets. The Mariners will see if Bay can can recapture the form that helped him bat .267/.384/.537 with 36 homers and 119 RBI in his last year in the AL with the Red Sox in 2009. In the three years since, he’s batted .234/.318/.369 with a total of 26 homers in 986 at-bats.

Bay is a native of British Columbia and he already lives in Seattle in the offseason, so it’s the perfect situation for him.

Bay’s addition won’t stop the Mariners from continuing to pursue bats. They’ve been mentioned in connection with free agents Josh Hamilton, Michael Bourn, Nick Swisher and Adam LaRoche, as well as in the Justin Upton trade speculation. If the Mariners do pick up another hitter or two, it’d seem to close off any route Bay might have to a starting job. Realistically, he’s probably going to end up competing with Casper Wells for one spot on the bench as a DH against lefties and occasional backup outfielder, and he’ll need a big spring just to have a shot.

David DeJesus retires

Harry How/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

Rich Schultz/Getty Images
4 Comments

Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.