Yunel Escobar a possibility for Rays, A’s and Red Sox

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While there are bigger names out there to be had, perhaps no player is more likely to be traded this week than new Marlins infielder Yunel Escobar.

Escobar was mostly included in the Jose Reyes-Josh Johnson megadeal for salary purposes, and the Marlins have been intent on moving him since the day they picked him up from the Blue Jays. CBSSports.com’s Danny Knobler says the A’s, Rays and Yankees are all interested, and FOXSports.com’s Jon Morosi says the Red Sox are also in the running.

The A’s, Rays and Red Sox would all be looking at Escobar as a shortstop, while the Yankees would presumably use him at third base until Alex Rodriguez is healthy.

According to Knobler, the Marlins’ talks with the A’s regarding Escobar have centered on prospects Grant Green and Brad Peacock. Green, a former first-round pick, has experience at shortstop, second base and in center field. He hit .296/.338/.458 as a 24-year-old in Triple-A last season. Peacock, who was sent to Oakland from the Nationals in the Gio Gonzalez deal, was 12-9 with a 6.01 ERA and a 139/66 K/BB ratio in 134 2/3 innings in Triple-A last season.

One imagines the A’s would like to see what happens with Stephen Drew before they surrender a prospect for Escobar. They already have an offer out to him.

Yankees sign Adam Lind to a minor league deal. Again.

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The Yankees signed Adam Lind to a minor league deal this past offseason. Then they released him during spring training. Now they have signed him to another minor league deal. He’ll report to extended spring training where he’ll now try not to get extended released.

Lind is a platoon guy with little defensive value, but he hit .303/.362/.513 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 301 plate appearances for the Nationals last season, serving as a pinch-hitter and backup first baseman and outfielder. The injury to Greg Bird and the impending suspension of Tyler Austin — he’s currently on appeal — will likely give him at least some opportunity to show that he’s still a big leaguer.

Which, yeah, he probably still is. Or at least would be if teams didn’t have 13 and 14-man pitching staffs and actually had room for a couple of bench position players. Such is not the current game of baseball, however.