Yankees could receive insurance funds if Alex Rodriguez can’t play

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So, the best thing A-Rod can do for the Yankees now is not play?

CBSSports.com’s Jon Heyman reports that the Yankees have insurance on Alex Rodriguez’s contract that would cover 75-80 percent of his salary if he proves unable to play due to injuries.

Rodriguez is currently expected to miss 4-6 months following hip surgery in January, potentially leaving him sidelined until June or July.

The way insurance on baseball contracts typically works is that it doesn’t kick in unless a player misses the entire season. Whether that’s the case here is unknown, but it’s a pretty good case there won’t be any immediate windfall for the team.

Rodriguez is signed for five more seasons at a total of $114 million. If his body continues to break down, then perhaps the Yankees will recover big portions of his salary in future years. It might also have luxury-tax ramifications. Technically, A-Rod’s salary would still count against the tax even if he were injured and insurance was covering it, but if the Yankees dropped him from the 40-man roster, it no longer would.

That’s what happened with disappointing import Kei Igawa before his contract expired. Since he was no longer on the 40-man, his salary didn’t figure in for tax purposes. However, the Yankees also couldn’t pay someone to take him — which would have had luxury tax ramifications — and they essentially held him hostage in the minors until his contract was up.

Reds sign outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera to minor league deals

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The Reds picked up outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera on minor league deals, MLB.com’s Mark Sheldon reports. Both Williams and Herrera will receive invites to spring training and could compete for backup outfield roles behind Adam Duvall, Billy Hamilton and Scott Schebler.

Williams, 26, completed a three-year track with the Yankees in 2017. He has yet to see a full season of playing time, however, and went 4-for-17 with two stolen bases during a five-game span with the club in 2017. While not a power hitter, his speed and steady contact rate produced a .263/.309/.318 batting line over 437 plate appearances in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, including two home runs, three triples and 19 stolen bases.

Herrera, 25, has yet to make his big league debut. After seven years in the Rockies’ system, he finally reached Triple-A Albuquerque in 2017 and slashed .278/.351/.394 with three home runs and 20 stolen bases in 363 PA. He looks most comfortable in the left field corner, but has some experience at shortstop and third base and should give the Reds a nice utility option come spring.