The Red Sox are talking to Adam LaRoche

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The Red Sox have reportedly identified Mike Napoli as their No. 1 target in free agency, but they are also weighing the alternatives.

According to CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman, the Red Sox are talking to Adam LaRoche as a potential fallback option for first base. The Red Sox have made a three-year offer to Napoli, but it’s believed that he wants a four-year deal. The Rangers and Mariners are his other prominent suitors.

Heyman hears that the Nationals have been “fairly steadfast” in offering LaRoche a two-year deal and they could hold firm on that acquiring Denard Span earlier today, as Bryce Harper and Jayson Werth project to play the corners while Michael Morse could simply slide over to first base. Of course, it’s still possible the Nationals could re-sign LaRoche and entertain trade offers for Morse.

LaRoche, 33, batted .271/.343/.510 with 33 home runs, 100 RBI and an .853 OPS this past season and also won his first Gold Glove award. He declined a $13.3 million qualifying offer from the Nationals in order to test free agency, so whoever signs him would have to surrender a draft pick.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.