B.J. Upton agrees to five-year, $75 million deal with Braves

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UPDATE: Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com now says Upton is “in agreement” with the Braves on a deal, pending a physical exam.

UPDATE #2: David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal Constitution indicates that it’ll be a five- or six-year contract and says there probably won’t be an official announcement until tomorrow.

UPDATE #3: Bob Nightengale of USA Today reports that it’s a five-year deal worth at least $70 million.

UPDATE #4: Nothing is official yet, but it might as well be after Upton changed his Twitter avatar to the following:

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“In serious talks” seems to be the buzz phrase of this offseason–see here and here, among others–and the latest usage is Jerry Crasnick of ESPN.com reporting that free agent center fielder B.J. Upton is “in serious talks” with the Braves on a multi-year contract.

A few days ago reports had Upton looking to decide on his new team by the end of this week and the teams most often linked to him have been the Braves and Phillies.

Upton has posted some terrible on-base percentages in recent years, but he’s a very young free agent at 28 and combines 25-homer power with 40-steal speed and excellent range defensively in center field. With the Braves he’d be replacing Michael Bourn, who’s also a free agent after one-and-a-half seasons in Atlanta.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.