Aroldis Chapman will be on innings limit in Reds’ rotation

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Aroldis Chapman is going to enter spring training next February as a starter. Should he also emerge as one, there will have to be a limit on the amount of innings that he throws in 2013 because he topped out at 71 2/3 frames as the Reds’ closer in 2012.

But that innings limit won’t be all that strict.

Reds pitching coach Bryan Price told John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer on Wednesday afternoon that he will “see where [Chapman] is in terms of innings and pitches after 25 or 30 starts.” Which is basically a full season for most healthy starting pitchers in the major leagues.

“We’ll know a lot more by the time we get to spring training,” Price added. “I don’t think there’s an absolute. You have to have a plan and hope it works. Any time you have a young pitcher and he’s going to surpass his inning total, there’s going to be questions if he gets hurt. We can’t be scared of that.”

Chapman has a dominant 2.33 ERA, 1.02 WHIP and 14.1 K/9 in 135 career major-league innings.

The 25-year-old left-hander is under contract with the Reds through the conclusion of the 2015 season.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.